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It probably shows that not many are using the rear brake.

When slowing right down and coming to a stop, its a good idea to let off the front brake and use the rear brake more. If you do this, you'll naturally put your left foot down first.

I always thought this, left foot change to netural , right foot on rear brake, then left foot down.!(but that was 20 odd years ago)

that would mean being stopped with both feet on the foot rests i agree with chris and glad i passed my test back the dark and distant past

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I knock my bike to neutral when I stop in traffic or at lights so I keep my right foot down so I can select first quick and get away. Plus it stops the newbie shuffle of left foot down then swap feet to select neutral and then swap to brake foot again, and then same in reverse to move away which is how your taught on your test

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Don't believe its a minor or major but "best practice" is left foot down.

 

Go to advanced level and left foot down is not best practice. Last thing you should be doing is going through what is called the "Hendon Shuffle" :wink:


However, putting my instructors head on for a moment from the L test point of view, whilst there are some examiners who like to see the left foot go to ground so that the rear brake is covered, at the end of the day this practice has to be flexible according to circumstance. It is no good putting your left foot down if the road is cambered away from you or there is a steep drop.


It is about doing what is safe for the circumstances, and so although even I like to see right foot go to ground when stationary when I am examining, it is not a deal breaker, it is about doing what is safe.

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I knock my bike to neutral when I stop in traffic or at lights so I keep my right foot down so I can select first quick and get away. Plus it stops the newbie shuffle of left foot down then swap feet to select neutral and then swap to brake foot again, and then same in reverse to move away which is how your taught on your test

 

:stupid:

It looks way cooler too... :lol: 8-)

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When you get onto a bigger bike, you Dont need to change gear so quickly when pulling away. Come to a stop in 1st gear and there is no need to keep your foot anywhere near the gear lever.

Its only smaller bikes where you have to rapidly change up a gear after pulling away.

Also hill starting a heavier bike, the rear brake is much better than trying to hold the front brake whilst giving it gas.

Personal choice at the end of the day, but why make life difficult??


See what happens when I get a bigger bike methinks :thumb:

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I knock my bike to neutral when I stop in traffic or at lights so I keep my right foot down so I can select first quick and get away. Plus it stops the newbie shuffle of left foot down then swap feet to select neutral and then swap to brake foot again, and then same in reverse to move away which is how your taught on your test

 

:stupid:

It looks way cooler too... :lol: 8-)

agreed lol. I'll stick to right foot down using front brake and keeping the rear as a control or added brake
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Not sure about this one, I thought it was go into neutral, right foot down too. From an actual safety point of view as well, not just because its easier.


What if you're rear ended at the lights whilst in gear. If you keep hold your going to end up opening the throttle fully and go flying out into traffic.


Other factors such as loosing grip on the clutch or the clutch cable breaking could cause you to lurch forward too.

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I was taught to change down the gears approaching lights/junctions etc so that by the time you stop you are in first. Right foot on the brake....and use it more at slow speeds. Left foot then goes down, holding back brake, gas ready and in gear ready to go. I only put in neutral if I need to open/close visor or something like that.


Slow manoeuvres are better with back brake, much smoother, so in a line of slow/stop/start traffic like at lights or big roundabout, left foot down is much easier. My front brakes are pretty fierce too, so not a good idea to use at low speeds!

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I was taught to change down the gears approaching lights/junctions etc so that by the time you stop you are in first. Right foot on the brake....and use it more at slow speeds. Left foot then goes down, holding back brake, gas ready and in gear ready to go. I only put in neutral if I need to open/close visor or something like that.


Slow manoeuvres are better with back brake, much smoother, so in a line of slow/stop/start traffic like at lights or big roundabout, left foot down is much easier. My front brakes are pretty fierce too, so not a good idea to use at low speeds!

 

Exactly. Where you come to a stop is the same place that all those cars with oil leaking out the bottom have stopped previously. High chance of there being a slippery surface so good idea to come to a stop with the rear brake and not the front.


Reading ahead, you already know if you're going to be stopped for any length of time, so you can either get into 1st gear or neutral before you stop.

If you're there for a while, take both feet off and have a stretch. No point staying leant over the tank if the lights are red..

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I was taught to change down the gears approaching lights/junctions etc so that by the time you stop you are in first. Right foot on the brake....and use it more at slow speeds. Left foot then goes down, holding back brake, gas ready and in gear ready to go. I only put in neutral if I need to open/close visor or something like that.


Slow manoeuvres are better with back brake, much smoother, so in a line of slow/stop/start traffic like at lights or big roundabout, left foot down is much easier. My front brakes are pretty fierce too, so not a good idea to use at low speeds!

 

Exactly. Where you come to a stop is the same place that all those cars with oil leaking out the bottom have stopped previously. High chance of there being a slippery surface so good idea to come to a stop with the rear brake and not the front.


Reading ahead, you already know if you're going to be stopped for any length of time, so you can either get into 1st gear or neutral before you stop.

If you're there for a while, take both feet off and have a stretch. No point staying leant over the tank if the lights are red..

 

Do you all chance to neutural when you stop? I stay in first..

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That would be determined by the length of wait, most of the time I either roll up in neutral or a gear not necessarily 1st, and 99.9 % of the time stop using front brake.


Only hold back brake if its a hill.

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I was taught to change down the gears approaching lights/junctions etc so that by the time you stop you are in first. Right foot on the brake....and use it more at slow speeds. Left foot then goes down, holding back brake, gas ready and in gear ready to go. I only put in neutral if I need to open/close visor or something like that.


Slow manoeuvres are better with back brake, much smoother, so in a line of slow/stop/start traffic like at lights or big roundabout, left foot down is much easier. My front brakes are pretty fierce too, so not a good idea to use at low speeds!

 


Exactly how i was taught and passed my test this way also. Although now sometimes i put it in neutral and sit up to give my back and wrists a break.

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Haven't rear the whole thread so disregard if already mentioned...


My tip would be to ride with a mate behind you and every time you stop get them to keep repeating "left foot down, left foot down, left foot down" in your ear (phone). That should do the trick.

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I have a habit of putting my right foot down, just seems easier to have my foot ready to change gear. However after reading this thread I've tried to put my left foot down but I found it really awkward going from neutral into first after doing the foot shuffle. I have started to use my rear brake for slower speeds and I must admit it's so much easier, less sharp.


Any tips on taking off? Obviously if I leave my bike in gear it's fine but I usually pop it into neutral if I know I'm going to be sat for a while.

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Any tips on taking off? Obviously if I leave my bike in gear it's fine but I usually pop it into neutral if I know I'm going to be sat for a while.

 

Observations. When the traffic starts moving ahead or the other lights change to red get the bike in gear ready. That way when its time to move off you're not jumping from one leg to the other

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Any tips on taking off? Obviously if I leave my bike in gear it's fine but I usually pop it into neutral if I know I'm going to be sat for a while.

 

Observations. When the traffic starts moving ahead or the other lights change to red get the bike in gear ready. That way when its time to move off you're not jumping from one leg to the other

 

I'm normally at the front as I filter through, and the lights can be unpredictable. I just have visions of me messing up my feet and dropping my bike :(

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