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Now fully licensed, bought bigger bike, what basic maintenance should I do?


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Hey lovely bikers


I'm back on the forum after a few years of riding a moped[i once posted that I had only been on it a month and 2 bams tried to steal it off me at a set of lights], then geared 125 for a year and since passing my full test in Feb have been itching to get a bigger more comfy bike.


My new bike arrives Tuesday [Honda cmx 500 rebel - yes I know it's not everyones favourite] and other than what I had been doing with my Honda cbf125 [keeping tyre pressure right, getting the requisite services, lubing my chain every 2 weeks] is there anything else I need to consider for keeping it well maintained?


I live in London, have no other option but to park it on the street, have like 7 locks for it and a very good quality Stormex cover and will be parking it away from the busier bits of my road [though still visible]


I'm bloody excited to be on something that won't kill my left hand/wrist from near constant gear changing and being able to go over 50mph without my engine sounding like a distressed lawnmower :)


Also looking forward to more ride outs and a wee visit to the Ace cafe when The RONA buggers off properly or we are at least allowed to socialise again


Ms_G

PS dream bike is a ducati scrambler[cafe racer] or triumph bonneville but I neither have the funds for that or the nerve to park it on london streets!!!

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The bit of maintenance you will need to do more frequently will be keeping the chain lubricated.

When I had my VFR I used a dry silicone chain lub and it's great.


Regular tyre pressure check unless you get a TPMS is important too.

keeping an eye on the engine oil at intervals of say 2 to 3 weeks is not a bad habit either.

Honda are well known for being robust machines so won't require a great deal of attention.

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Congratulations. The Rebel is a nice bike and very capable. Honda build quality isn't quite what it used to be so consider investing in some ACF50 and spraying around the frame and parts where you are less likely to able to reach. I looked at those a while back and noticed some fine spider web corrosion markings around the head stock and frame bits where damp can sit.


Otherwise it's tyres, oil level, chain, lights as the most frequent checks. Then stick to routine servicing as per the manual. Personally I change the oil more frequently because I'm old school and don't believe in extended oil changes. The oil still lubricates but it loses it's detergents over time and that's what keep the engine internals clean.


If it's a new bike check the valve clearance service, I seem to remember those need them checking very early on and it's expensive. Most new buyers haggle to get that included for free.

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Nice one. Good choice with the Honda :thumb: Read through the owners manual. That will have the maintenance procedure in it. If it's brand new follow the break in procedure, it should also be in the owners manual. If you want to do your own maintenance read the workshop manual. That will have all the info you need. Luckily someone has put it up https://drive.google.com/file/d/1f_MYojSW9JdmVXzdx5xzXzLyKLkwIa6X/view

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The bit of maintenance you will need to do more frequently will be keeping the chain lubricated.

When I had my VFR I used a dry silicone chain lub and it's great.


Regular tyre pressure check unless you get a TPMS is important too.

keeping an eye on the engine oil at intervals of say 2 to 3 weeks is not a bad habit either.

Honda are well known for being robust machines so won't require a great deal of attention.

 

Ah thanks :) So avoid WD40 chain lube then? That's what I was using on my CB125f - also what is TPMS?

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Congratulations. The Rebel is a nice bike and very capable. Honda build quality isn't quite what it used to be so consider investing in some ACF50 and spraying around the frame and parts where you are less likely to able to reach. I looked at those a while back and noticed some fine spider web corrosion markings around the head stock and frame bits where damp can sit.


Otherwise it's tyres, oil level, chain, lights as the most frequent checks. Then stick to routine servicing as per the manual. Personally I change the oil more frequently because I'm old school and don't believe in extended oil changes. The oil still lubricates but it loses it's detergents over time and that's what keep the engine internals clean.


If it's a new bike check the valve clearance service, I seem to remember those need them checking very early on and it's expensive. Most new buyers haggle to get that included for free.

 

Yeah I'm excited to get my rebel :) They are adding a ceramic coating for me, will this help re rust/damp? I've never changed oil myself but I suspect I can check the manual or youtube right?


Re valve clearance, what is that exactly? Should I check this with the dealership in advance?

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Nice one. Good choice with the Honda :thumb: Read through the owners manual. That will have the maintenance procedure in it. If it's brand new follow the break in procedure, it should also be in the owners manual. If you want to do your own maintenance read the workshop manual. That will have all the info you need. Luckily someone has put it up https://drive.google.com/file/d/1f_MYojSW9JdmVXzdx5xzXzLyKLkwIa6X/view

 

amazing, thank you!

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STAY AWAY FROM WD40 :shock: :shock:


WD40 is corrosive and will destroy the o-rings in the chain.


dry silicone lub is the best, even better for bikes left outside and more subject to moisture. It will keep water at bay for longer and will protect the rings.


This is one of the best

https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/346257

You will find a link in the forum to sportsbikeshop that will help the website so you should use it.

TMPS stands for Tyre Pressure Monitoring System

I bought one from China and it works perfectly (you can see a photo of it in my thread for tank cover)

It's very easy to install and works really well.

https://www.dhgate.com/product/m3-tire-pressure-monitoring-system-tpms-wireless/510396113.html?d1_page_num=1&dspm=pcen.sp.list.19.VLElqfkMG9iMTDhNrlJl&resource_id=510396113#s1-15-1;searl|3624277386:19

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I was in a similar position recently and I found the Haynes manual helpful. It gives a Maintainance schedule, explains about how to do it and also how hard it is. Cannot recommend it enough.

Although caution, I started with curiosity and then have now, with a lot of help from here, currently have the brakes off and the carbs and have changed the stator and reg/rec :-)

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STAY AWAY FROM WD40 :shock: :shock:


WD40 is corrosive and will destroy the o-rings in the chain.

 

NO NO NO!


She said WD40 chain lube! not the original WD40


This stuff which is perfectly safe to use

2459A6DD-1AE0-4E06-9267-6D54046DFF93-large.jpg

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STAY AWAY FROM WD40 :shock: :shock:


WD40 is corrosive and will destroy the o-rings in the chain.


dry silicone lub is the best, even better for bikes left outside and more subject to moisture. It will keep water at bay for longer and will protect the rings.


This is one of the best

https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/346257

You will find a link in the forum to sportsbikeshop that will help the website so you should use it.

TMPS stands for Tyre Pressure Monitoring System

I bought one from China and it works perfectly (you can see a photo of it in my thread for tank cover)

It's very easy to install and works really well.

https://www.dhgate.com/product/m3-tire-pressure-monitoring-system-tpms-wireless/510396113.html?d1_page_num=1&dspm=pcen.sp.list.19.VLElqfkMG9iMTDhNrlJl&resource_id=510396113#s1-15-1;searl|3624277386:19

 

Thank you so much, will check those out

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I was in a similar position recently and I found the Haynes manual helpful. It gives a Maintainance schedule, explains about how to do it and also how hard it is. Cannot recommend it enough.

Although caution, I started with curiosity and then have now, with a lot of help from here, currently have the brakes off and the carbs and have changed the stator and reg/rec :-)

 

Lol 😂 I think if I had a garage a certain amount of tinkering might happen as I’m quite a mechanically minded person (sculptor) but given it would be trying to do stuff on the street I’ll likely leave it to the professionals

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There's the owners manual https://cdn.powersports.honda.com/documentum/MWOM/ml.remawmom.2020_31mkga30_cmx500_rebel.pdf

It recommends Pro Honda HP Chain Lube or equivalent http://prohondaoil.com/

I used spray lube cans in the past but they're high price and don't last very long. After going through a few cans I got sick of that and switched to 80-90W gear oil. Does a great job at protecting the chain. It's not for everyone though. You have to apply it more often than the spray lube and you have to apply the right amount or it will fling off. I brush it on once a week with an old toothbrush and that works for me.

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STAY AWAY FROM WD40 :shock: :shock:


WD40 is corrosive and will destroy the o-rings in the chain.

 

NO NO NO!


She said WD40 chain lube! not the original WD40


This stuff which is perfectly safe to use

2459A6DD-1AE0-4E06-9267-6D54046DFF93-large.jpg

Yes that’s what I have 😊😊

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The bit of maintenance you will need to do more frequently will be keeping the chain lubricated.

When I had my VFR I used a dry silicone chain lub and it's great.


Regular tyre pressure check unless you get a TPMS is important too.

keeping an eye on the engine oil at intervals of say 2 to 3 weeks is not a bad habit either.

Honda are well known for being robust machines so won't require a great deal of attention.

 

Ah thanks :) So avoid WD40 chain lube then? That's what I was using on my CB125f - also what is TPMS?

 

https://www.thedrive.com/reviews/32190/best-motorcycle-tpms

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The bit of maintenance you will need to do more frequently will be keeping the chain lubricated.

When I had my VFR I used a dry silicone chain lub and it's great.


Regular tyre pressure check unless you get a TPMS is important too.

keeping an eye on the engine oil at intervals of say 2 to 3 weeks is not a bad habit either.

Honda are well known for being robust machines so won't require a great deal of attention.

 

Ah thanks :) So avoid WD40 chain lube then? That's what I was using on my CB125f - also what is TPMS?

 

https://www.thedrive.com/reviews/32190/best-motorcycle-tpms

 

But WD40 isn't a dry silicone lube.

From experience, dry silicone will last around 500 miles while normal "wet" lube is only good for short rides... :twisted: :twisted:

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Congratulations :thumb: Sounds like it's all been said and all good advice, at the end of the day it's a Honda and there pretty robust, just follow the basic maintenance steps as described. If like me you ride all year round then I would invest in some ACF50 as well....Time to get out and enjoy..... :cheers:

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Ah thanks :) So avoid WD40 chain lube then? That's what I was using on my CB125f - also what is TPMS?

 

https://www.thedrive.com/reviews/32190/best-motorcycle-tpms

 

But WD40 isn't a dry silicone lube.

From experience, dry silicone will last around 500 miles while normal "wet" lube is only good for short rides... :twisted: :twisted:

 

Or you could fit something like a Scott Oiler.

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Congratulations. The Rebel is a nice bike and very capable. Honda build quality isn't quite what it used to be so consider investing in some ACF50 and spraying around the frame and parts where you are less likely to able to reach. I looked at those a while back and noticed some fine spider web corrosion markings around the head stock and frame bits where damp can sit.


Otherwise it's tyres, oil level, chain, lights as the most frequent checks. Then stick to routine servicing as per the manual. Personally I change the oil more frequently because I'm old school and don't believe in extended oil changes. The oil still lubricates but it loses it's detergents over time and that's what keep the engine internals clean.


If it's a new bike check the valve clearance service, I seem to remember those need them checking very early on and it's expensive. Most new buyers haggle to get that included for free.

 

Yeah I'm excited to get my rebel :) They are adding a ceramic coating for me, will this help re rust/damp? I've never changed oil myself but I suspect I can check the manual or youtube right?


Re valve clearance, what is that exactly? Should I check this with the dealership in advance?

 

Most engines need the valve clearances checking periodically. Usually it doesn't need doing until higher mileages but if I remember right the Honda 500 engine used to have a valve clearance check at the first service interval. Since it's fairly costly to have a dealer carry it out most buyers of new bikes haggled the cost of the first service into the purchase price.


Worth checking.


I don't know what the ceramic coating is being applied to but I'm sure it can't be the whole frame. Just give it a coat of ACF 50 and it will be fine.

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Congratulations. The Rebel is a nice bike and very capable. Honda build quality isn't quite what it used to be so consider investing in some ACF50 and spraying around the frame and parts where you are less likely to able to reach. I looked at those a while back and noticed some fine spider web corrosion markings around the head stock and frame bits where damp can sit.


Otherwise it's tyres, oil level, chain, lights as the most frequent checks. Then stick to routine servicing as per the manual. Personally I change the oil more frequently because I'm old school and don't believe in extended oil changes. The oil still lubricates but it loses it's detergents over time and that's what keep the engine internals clean.


If it's a new bike check the valve clearance service, I seem to remember those need them checking very early on and it's expensive. Most new buyers haggle to get that included for free.

 

Yeah I'm excited to get my rebel :) They are adding a ceramic coating for me, will this help re rust/damp? I've never changed oil myself but I suspect I can check the manual or youtube right?


Re valve clearance, what is that exactly? Should I check this with the dealership in advance?

 

Most engines need the valve clearances checking periodically. Usually it doesn't need doing until higher mileages but if I remember right the Honda 500 engine used to have a valve clearance check at the first service interval. Since it's fairly costly to have a dealer carry it out most buyers of new bikes haggled the cost of the first service into the purchase price.


Worth checking.


I don't know what the ceramic coating is being applied to but I'm sure it can't be the whole frame. Just give it a coat of ACF 50 and it will be fine.

 

If you look at the maintenance schedule in his manual it says the first service is at 1000km and it's just an oil and filter change. The valve clearance is first checked at 25600Km. His bike has shims. Maybe the older bike had tappets? They need adjustment more regularly than the newer style shims

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Yeah I'm excited to get my rebel :) They are adding a ceramic coating for me, will this help re rust/damp? I've never changed oil myself but I suspect I can check the manual or youtube right?


Re valve clearance, what is that exactly? Should I check this with the dealership in advance?

 

Most engines need the valve clearances checking periodically. Usually it doesn't need doing until higher mileages but if I remember right the Honda 500 engine used to have a valve clearance check at the first service interval. Since it's fairly costly to have a dealer carry it out most buyers of new bikes haggled the cost of the first service into the purchase price.


Worth checking.


I don't know what the ceramic coating is being applied to but I'm sure it can't be the whole frame. Just give it a coat of ACF 50 and it will be fine.

 

If you look at the maintenance schedule in his manual it says the first service is at 1000km and it's just an oil and filter change. The valve clearance is first checked at 25600Km. His bike has shims. Maybe the older bike had tappets? They need adjustment more regularly than the newer style shims

 

It was the 2016 Honda 500 engine I was looking at. It was one issue picked up in a lot of reviews that the first service included checking the valve clearances. My guess is they found none of them needed adjusting and it was proving unpopular so they've dropped it.

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Most engines need the valve clearances checking periodically. Usually it doesn't need doing until higher mileages but if I remember right the Honda 500 engine used to have a valve clearance check at the first service interval. Since it's fairly costly to have a dealer carry it out most buyers of new bikes haggled the cost of the first service into the purchase price.


Worth checking.


I don't know what the ceramic coating is being applied to but I'm sure it can't be the whole frame. Just give it a coat of ACF 50 and it will be fine.

 

If you look at the maintenance schedule in his manual it says the first service is at 1000km and it's just an oil and filter change. The valve clearance is first checked at 25600Km. His bike has shims. Maybe the older bike had tappets? They need adjustment more regularly than the newer style shims

 

It was the 2016 Honda 500 engine I was looking at. It was one issue picked up in a lot of reviews that the first service included checking the valve clearances. My guess is they found none of them needed adjusting and it was proving unpopular so they've dropped it.

This 250 manual is confirming what you're saying about checking the valve clearance. https://cdn.powersports.honda.com/documentum/MWOM/ml.remawmom.2016_31k17640_cmx250_rebel.pdf

Check the valve clearance at 1000km and every 6000km after that. Seems a bit odd on a modern street bike.

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Hey lovely bikers


I'm back on the forum after a few years of riding a moped[i once posted that I had only been on it a month and 2 bams tried to steal it off me at a set of lights], then geared 125 for a year and since passing my full test in Feb have been itching to get a bigger more comfy bike.


My new bike arrives Tuesday [Honda cmx 500 rebel - yes I know it's not everyones favourite] and other than what I had been doing with my Honda cbf125 [keeping tyre pressure right, getting the requisite services, lubing my chain every 2 weeks] is there anything else I need to consider for keeping it well maintained?


I live in London, have no other option but to park it on the street, have like 7 locks for it and a very good quality Stormex cover and will be parking it away from the busier bits of my road [though still visible]


I'm bloody excited to be on something that won't kill my left hand/wrist from near constant gear changing and being able to go over 50mph without my engine sounding like a distressed lawnmower :)


Also looking forward to more ride outs and a wee visit to the Ace cafe when The RONA buggers off properly or we are at least allowed to socialise again


Ms_G

PS dream bike is a ducati scrambler[cafe racer] or triumph bonneville but I neither have the funds for that or the nerve to park it on london streets!!!



For chain maintenance, after trying various methods I now clean with parafin in a spray bottle using old rags until its clean and dry then use 80/90 gear oil lightly applied with a brush then wipe off the excess with a cloth. A bottle of parafin and gear oil will last years and is much cheaper than canned lube. It is fiddly but economical and its what the chain manufacturers recommend. I have used motul chain paste too which is good.


As others have said, ACF50 is a must for the winter and be prepared to strip your brakes and clean with a tooth brush and brake cleaner once in a while if you are riding all year round. Main thing is; enjoy it and if you are not sure or not confident how to do something ask. This forum is excellent.

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