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Suzuki GSX-S1000 Redesign Due


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Suzuki’s new teaser for its upcoming GSX-S1000 model reveals more modern, triple stacked LEDs leading the way.
Suzuki’s new teaser for its upcoming GSX-S1000 model reveals more modern, triple stacked LEDs leading the way. (Suzuki/)

While other Japanese firms pump out new bikes at a breakneck rate, Suzuki operates at a steadier pace, so news that a new GSX-S1000 will soon be revealed—hot on the heels of the revamped 2021 Hayabusa—comes as something of a surprise.

The bike is the subject of a new teaser video from the firm that, as usual with such marketing tricks, is designed to give away as little as possible. It’s the usual format: darkened images, close-up glimpses, and a somewhat nonsensical slogan—in this case “the beauty of naked aggression”—which in any other context would seem a somewhat disturbing notion. However, there’s a fair amount that can be interpreted from the teaser as well as Suzuki’s recent trends in new model development.

The tagline likely refers to a more modern exterior redo of the existing GSX-S1000.
The tagline likely refers to a more modern exterior redo of the existing GSX-S1000. (Suzuki/)

While it’s tempting to imagine that Suzuki will go all-out on its next-gen GSX-S1000 and create a 200 hp Ducati Streetfighter V4 rival by stripping the fairing off the latest GSX-R1000, the reality is that the firm’s development pattern in recent years has been to cleverly reskin existing components and add a veneer of technology. We saw it with the Katana (which is, of course, GSX-S1000-based), and again with the V-Strom 1050. Even the new Hayabusa confounded expectations that the firm might have spent years developing radical technology for the bike; instead it carried over a refined and revamped version of the existing engine in a virtually unaltered chassis.

RELATED: GSX-S1000Z

Every indication suggests the same tactics will be applied to the GSX-S1000, and it’s a route that actually makes a lot of sense. For all the theoretical appeal of a super-naked derived from the latest GSX-R1000, the reality is that the existing GSX-S1000, with a 150 hp engine spawned from an all-time great, the 2005 GSX-R1000 K5, already has performance to spare on the road. Building a new version around the latest superbike’s variable valve timing engine and exotic chassis would inevitably increase price while offering only marginal benefits to the majority of customers in the market for such a bike.

A restyled fuel tank and tail seem likely, and the new gold-colored fork suggests there will be updates to the suspension as well.
A restyled fuel tank and tail seem likely, and the new gold-colored fork suggests there will be updates to the suspension as well. (Japanese Patent Office/)

The Katana has already proven that the GSX-S1000′s bones can easily be clad in more attractive bodywork, and by covering the part of the market that wants a retro-styled machine, it opens the door for the GSX-S itself to be made into a more overtly modern-looking bike. That’s the “naked aggression” that Suzuki’s teaser is talking about, and even in a darkened room the glimpses of the new bike show a vast improvement over the rather dowdy and dated GSX-S1000.

Up front, triple stacked LEDs replace the oh-so-20th-century halogen headlight of the current model, and there are unmistakable, downward-turned winglets either side of the nose. Side panels jutting forward from the edges of the fuel tank wrap around the fork, almost meeting the headlight unit and acting as supports for those winglets. The overall effect should push the visual weight of the bike forward, with further assistance from a new fuel tank that’s angled to meld more smoothly into the seat. The tail, although largely hidden in the teaser, also appears to be restyled, and the new GSX-S1000 appears to lack the pointy-fronted bellypan of the current model, leaving the exhaust headers in clear view instead.

Technically, the changes aren’t likely to be vast. With luck we’ll get suspension updates, and the teaser certainly shows a revised fork with a gold-colored coating instead of the current bike’s black finish unit. The brakes appear to be unchanged, but since the GSX-S1000 already has Brembo radial calipers, that’s no bad thing.

No doubt there will be updates to the bike’s electronics, and of course the fact that there’s a new GSX-S1000 is a sure indicator that the faired GSX-S1000F is also likely to be right behind it in the queue for revisions. Full details of the new bike are coming on April 26, so there isn’t long to wait. If you were about to pull the trigger on a rival model like Honda’s CB1000R, it might be worth holding back just to check what Suzuki has in store.

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23 minutes ago, Admin said:

Suzuki’s new teaser for its upcoming GSX-S1000 model reveals more modern, triple stacked LEDs leading the way.
Suzuki’s new teaser for its upcoming GSX-S1000 model reveals more modern, triple stacked LEDs leading the way. (Suzuki/)

While other Japanese firms pump out new bikes at a breakneck rate, Suzuki operates at a steadier pace, so news that a new GSX-S1000 will soon be revealed—hot on the heels of the revamped 2021 Hayabusa—comes as something of a surprise.

The bike is the subject of a new teaser video from the firm that, as usual with such marketing tricks, is designed to give away as little as possible. It’s the usual format: darkened images, close-up glimpses, and a somewhat nonsensical slogan—in this case “the beauty of naked aggression”—which in any other context would seem a somewhat disturbing notion. However, there’s a fair amount that can be interpreted from the teaser as well as Suzuki’s recent trends in new model development.

The tagline likely refers to a more modern exterior redo of the existing GSX-S1000.
The tagline likely refers to a more modern exterior redo of the existing GSX-S1000. (Suzuki/)

While it’s tempting to imagine that Suzuki will go all-out on its next-gen GSX-S1000 and create a 200 hp Ducati Streetfighter V4 rival by stripping the fairing off the latest GSX-R1000, the reality is that the firm’s development pattern in recent years has been to cleverly reskin existing components and add a veneer of technology. We saw it with the Katana (which is, of course, GSX-S1000-based), and again with the V-Strom 1050. Even the new Hayabusa confounded expectations that the firm might have spent years developing radical technology for the bike; instead it carried over a refined and revamped version of the existing engine in a virtually unaltered chassis.

 

RELATED: GSX-S1000Z

 

Every indication suggests the same tactics will be applied to the GSX-S1000, and it’s a route that actually makes a lot of sense. For all the theoretical appeal of a super-naked derived from the latest GSX-R1000, the reality is that the existing GSX-S1000, with a 150 hp engine spawned from an all-time great, the 2005 GSX-R1000 K5, already has performance to spare on the road. Building a new version around the latest superbike’s variable valve timing engine and exotic chassis would inevitably increase price while offering only marginal benefits to the majority of customers in the market for such a bike.

A restyled fuel tank and tail seem likely, and the new gold-colored fork suggests there will be updates to the suspension as well.
A restyled fuel tank and tail seem likely, and the new gold-colored fork suggests there will be updates to the suspension as well. (Japanese Patent Office/)

The Katana has already proven that the GSX-S1000′s bones can easily be clad in more attractive bodywork, and by covering the part of the market that wants a retro-styled machine, it opens the door for the GSX-S itself to be made into a more overtly modern-looking bike. That’s the “naked aggression” that Suzuki’s teaser is talking about, and even in a darkened room the glimpses of the new bike show a vast improvement over the rather dowdy and dated GSX-S1000.

Up front, triple stacked LEDs replace the oh-so-20th-century halogen headlight of the current model, and there are unmistakable, downward-turned winglets either side of the nose. Side panels jutting forward from the edges of the fuel tank wrap around the fork, almost meeting the headlight unit and acting as supports for those winglets. The overall effect should push the visual weight of the bike forward, with further assistance from a new fuel tank that’s angled to meld more smoothly into the seat. The tail, although largely hidden in the teaser, also appears to be restyled, and the new GSX-S1000 appears to lack the pointy-fronted bellypan of the current model, leaving the exhaust headers in clear view instead.

Technically, the changes aren’t likely to be vast. With luck we’ll get suspension updates, and the teaser certainly shows a revised fork with a gold-colored coating instead of the current bike’s black finish unit. The brakes appear to be unchanged, but since the GSX-S1000 already has Brembo radial calipers, that’s no bad thing.

No doubt there will be updates to the bike’s electronics, and of course the fact that there’s a new GSX-S1000 is a sure indicator that the faired GSX-S1000F is also likely to be right behind it in the queue for revisions. Full details of the new bike are coming on April 26, so there isn’t long to wait. If you were about to pull the trigger on a rival model like Honda’s CB1000R, it might be worth holding back just to check what Suzuki has in store.

View the full article

could have been better if they had put some lights on when they were taking photos of it :classic_unsure:

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