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GARYJL
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Anyone into photography ?

I just bought myself a Nikon D5000 Digital SLR and was hoping

someone could give me a bit of advice on lenses. The camera

came with an AF-S NIKKOR 18-55mm lens but im thinking about

buying another lens which would be more suited to zooming in

from further away.

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I love photography but haven't yet got round to a digital SLR - mainly because of the bulk of carrying it around! I used to have an 'old fashioned' SLR and had the 70-300 lens as I needed the zoom - it was a really good lens and not too big, I hardly ever used the standard lens once I had that one.

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I picked up a used Nikon 70-300mm for about £100, got some ace shots at the formula 1 with it.


One thing to watch out for though is the D5000 doesn't have a built in autofocus motor so you probably want a lens with it's own AF motor (otherwise you'll have to manually focus all the time). There's a Tamron 70-300mm one for about £140 that includes AF.


Depends how much you want to spend really, sky is the limit!


Not sure if we can link sales sites, good load of zoom lenses here: http://www.warehouseexpress.com/nikon-f ... &ShowAll=1

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Really love photography myself, though i don't understand it properly. Just bought a Cannon DSLR500D. Just getting to grips with it at the moment, reading up on the basics and will be doing a night school course in November to get more knowledge.

I do know i want a wide angle lens though, for scenery shots

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I love photography but haven't yet got round to a digital SLR - mainly because of the bulk of carrying it around! I used to have an 'old fashioned' SLR and had the 70-300 lens as I needed the zoom - it was a really good lens and not too big, I hardly ever used the standard lens once I had that one.

 

Can't understand this. My 'SLR' film camera is almost identical in size and weight to my DSLR.

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I used to do a lot of photography, still have half a dozen SLR bodies, got a good digital SLR a couple of years ago but I still reckon film gives you a noticeably better end result.


As to lenses, there are a load of indi makers of which Tamron and Sigma are probably the best and a zoom will give you the flexibility. My longest lens is a Sigma 170-500, this cost an arm and a leg but my main interest is wildlife and landscape so I kinda justified it to myself. Main thing to remember with longer lense is that you lose light, which results in a slower shutter speed unless you open the aperture a bit in which case you sacrifice depth of field.


Fortunately Nell and I have moved into a smallholding right next to a river with all kinds of wildlife, (kingfishers, dippers, herons......) so all my kit will be brought out of the hybernation its been in for the last 2 years :lol: :lol: :lol: I may be tempted to add a top end Digital SLR to my collection, think Cannon have one with about 18mpix :roll: :P

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Can't understand this. My 'SLR' film camera is almost identical in size and weight to my DSLR.

 

Then you have one very light SLR film camera as my two are massively different in weight. Probably a good half a kilo more in the SLR.


I dont like Nikon myself as they provide precision shots BUT they are fiddly and require a good amount of skill to get it right and sometimes you just dont have the time. Im going for the new Canon 450D as the gadget show rated it very highly, it focuses brilliantly and my hobby often involves running away from rozzers, so I need it to get the shots without too much farting about...


Depends what you want it for though, Nikons can provide a good consistency of shots in day time conditions. I prefer canon for night time which is where most of my photography lies.

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Aye, your right mate. Just got them both out and compared. The SLR is very light indeed and it has a B&W film in it. The DSLR is slightly heavier but not by much at all.


Picture was taken on my phone so it's crap quality (Ironic eh!!) and I have the shakes!! (Hangover, not very ironic!)


http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e200/pprune/IMG_0498.jpg


You still exploring then Fozzie, I have not done any for ages now mate. :(

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I've been looking at lenses on the net and in town today and some

of them are nearly as expensive as the camera.

I was looking at a Tamron 70-300mm F4/5.6 DI LD Macro (Nikon AF)

but im not sure if it would be any good as it's about £200 cheater

than an equivilent Nikon lens. I know the Nikon would definately be

a more superior lens but as a beginner is it going to be worth it ?

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Have a read of some reviews mate. I have a sony alpha and I use a 18-50mm (f/2.8) wide angle for general and scenery shots (also this large aperture is great for low light stuff as well), and a 70-300mm (f/4-5.6) for the long stuff. 300 is pretty good, 400 or 500mm would be better, as would a bigger aperture for faster shots, but then costs start to increase. Both mine are sigma and are excellent both in quality and (as I don't have huge wedges of cash to throw around) value for money. They do lenses to fit most bodies.

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Just a quick one for the OP. Looks like you've had some helpful replies but I'd like to add this.


Before you buy any new glass, use what you have. There's a lot to learn and I honestly think you'd do well using the stock lens for now. Get to grips with the camera and making good exposures. Once you've done that you'll have an idea about where your lens is limiting you. Could be that you want something longer, but equally you might decide by then that something faster (low f numbers) or wider instead.

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Can't understand this. My 'SLR' film camera is almost identical in size and weight to my DSLR.

 

Then you have one very light SLR film camera as my two are massively different in weight. Probably a good half a kilo more in the SLR.


I dont like Nikon myself as they provide precision shots BUT they are fiddly and require a good amount of skill to get it right and sometimes you just dont have the time. Im going for the new Canon 450D as the gadget show rated it very highly, it focuses brilliantly and my hobby often involves running away from rozzers, so I need it to get the shots without too much farting about...


Depends what you want it for though, Nikons can provide a good consistency of shots in day time conditions. I prefer canon for night time which is where most of my photography lies.

 

IIRC you in to urban exploration type stuff or is that someone else?

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Just a quick one for the OP. Looks like you've had some helpful replies but I'd like to add this.


Before you buy any new glass, use what you have. There's a lot to learn and I honestly think you'd do well using the stock lens for now. Get to grips with the camera and making good exposures. Once you've done that you'll have an idea about where your lens is limiting you. Could be that you want something longer, but equally you might decide by then that something faster (low f numbers) or wider instead.

 

Cheers for the advice but as impatient as I am I just bought a Nikon

70-300 online so hopefully its a good buy. Been looking online and

really interested in long exposure shots especially in complete darkness

when the camera picks up light the human eye cant see.

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I love photography but haven't yet got round to a digital SLR - mainly because of the bulk of carrying it around! I used to have an 'old fashioned' SLR and had the 70-300 lens as I needed the zoom - it was a really good lens and not too big, I hardly ever used the standard lens once I had that one.

 

Can't understand this. My 'SLR' film camera is almost identical in size and weight to my DSLR.

 

I wasn't comparing it to my old SLR (which was very bulky!), just to my digital bridge camera which I can put in my pocket. Obviously it doesn't have the picture quality of an SLR but is is more portable :)

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Just a quick one for the OP. Looks like you've had some helpful replies but I'd like to add this.


Before you buy any new glass, use what you have. There's a lot to learn and I honestly think you'd do well using the stock lens for now. Get to grips with the camera and making good exposures. Once you've done that you'll have an idea about where your lens is limiting you. Could be that you want something longer, but equally you might decide by then that something faster (low f numbers) or wider instead.

 

Cheers for the advice but as impatient as I am I just bought a Nikon

70-300 online so hopefully its a good buy. Been looking online and

really interested in long exposure shots especially in complete darkness

when the camera picks up light the human eye cant see.

http://www.lostamerica.com/

I have a feeling you might appreciate this. ;)


I saw some fascinating long exposure shots taken in daylight (hours and hours long) a while back but the bookmark is on another computer. I'll see if I can find it and post it up though. Until then, imagine a daytime shot of Trafalgar Square without a single person, car or bird in it. That's the kind of thing.


With or without the new lens I suggest you try my above advice though. A lot of people make the mistake of thinking they need certain kit to get the kind of shots they want when in fact they need to learn to control their camera and frame shots properly. Far, far more important than having the right kit.


If you want to do long exposures I'd suggest the following are absolutely essential.

* Tripod. Get a good one, heavy = more stable, light = easier to lug around. It's always a compromise.

* Remote shutter release. Lets you shoot an image without touching the camera which is definitely a good thing. The tiny movements your hand imparts to the camera when you use the built in shutter make for a less sharp image than using a cable release.

* A bit of black card. What? Yep... black card. Bonfire night is fast approaching. Get a good spot and frame the shot before the display. Open the shutter for as long as possible (if you can open and close it manually all the better) when you want to start and hold the card over the lens, take it off to catch good fireworks and put it back in quiet bits. That's how they get loads of fireworks in a single shot rather than a shot of each. Simple and very effective. Even if you're not into that kind of shot it's fun to take.

* Common sense. I'm pretty streetwise but one night taking shots I put myself in a stupid situation and was mugged and beaten for my camera, phone, wallet, rucksack (basically everything I had) by about 8 guys. 2 weeks of notes and undeveloped work in my bag all lost. Gutted. Entirely my fault. Don't do it.


strobist.blogspot.com is always worth a read.

Check the "welcome" link and then the "101" series. Both linked from the top right hand corner of the page.


Good luck. If you approach it right you'll be making some stunning images in no time. :D


Oh yea - and welcome to a thoroughly rewarding if often expensive hobby. Do yourself a favour and stop looking at lenses now before you find yourself sleeping under a park bench clutching a bag full of fast lenses as your only worldly possessions. :P

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:stupid:


Fully agree, I use an old EOS 300D and a couple of old cannon film lenses that I had for my wet film slr. None of my lenses are particularly good, and the camera and lens takes a fairly long time to focus (especially the 80-210 zoom lens) so it made me learn about tracking, framing and pre-focussing.


Even with this old kit I can get some pretty good shots even if I say so myself and I love just playing around with different effects.


Bigshot, thanks for the tip for fireworks will give that a shot soon.

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Most welcome.

One thing I didn't mention was aperture. I think I usually shoot fireworks at f8. There are a few decent tutorials for the black card method online tho so it'll be easy enough to check.




Oh, and a couple more points for the OP. Whether or not you use a shutter release cable, some cameras allow you to raise the mirror a second or two before the shutter opens. The mirror lifting causes pretty violent vibrations so raising it earlier lets them calm down a bit before the exposure.


Finally, you may have noticed that the viewfinder goes black when you shoot (I assume that's the case, it is for most SLRs). The shot is taken while it's black. That means if you see something in the viewfinder... you missed it. You need to learn to anticipate the perfect moment and take the shot just before it. If you don't see it happen in the viewfinder, there's a good chance you caught it.

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Hi,


I bought a D5000 a couple of months ago as an upgrade to a D50 that I've been using for a couple of years.

I already had a Nikon AF-S VR 70-300 f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED lens which is superb (although a little pricey) but with the vibration reduction built in it's usable at full zoom without a tripod in normal light.


I can thoroughly recommend "Nikon D5000 - from Snapshots to Great Shots" by Jeff Revell. Easy to read with exmaples of how to get the best from most scenarios you're likely to meet.


The link shows some pics taken a couple of weekends ago at Oulton Park - BSB event - taken with D5000 using the zoom lens above



http://picasaweb.google.com/skarcrow/OultonPark?authkey=Gv1sRgCLPJ_9ae9MHYZw&feat=directlink

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I'd love to switch to digital, but currently using a Dynax 7000i SLR, along with a Minolta Lens (not too sure of the size), got some nice over-epxo's a few weeks back when the local town got hit by flooding :)

 

I am sure I used to have one of those! Paid £700 for it years ago!!

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was at oulton yesterday and got some decent shots....used my mates canon 70-200, cracking lens but cant justify the 1000 pound price tag on it...


http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm99/tmbf_photos/Oulton%2020th%20oct/IMG_8710.jpg


http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm99/tmbf_photos/Oulton%2020th%20oct/IMG_8964.jpg


http://i294.photobucket.com/albums/mm99/tmbf_photos/Oulton%2020th%20oct/IMG_9023.jpg

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