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Disaster has struck....close to tears - clutch?


Lumor_uk
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Was fine yesterday coming home from work, this morning popped it into 1st got 25 meters down the road and it popped out of gear. Tried putting it back into gear but nothing, tried a few more times and there was a clunking noise coming from the left hand side. So basically it won't go into gear now.


I've not adjusted the cable in the year I've had it, I'm hoping it's that. Not looking forward to being without my bike. Luckily I'm off work this weekend.

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I had a similar problem with my bike not going into gear, ended up being a loose chain. New chain and sprockets, sorted! No idea if yours could be the same thing but maybe worth checking? With mine I could get it into 1st and 2nd with a fight but the gear change lever wouldn't physically move at all to even try getting it into 3rd.

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ha cheers for that :cheers: my chain is very loose at the minute. Got one notch to move it back and yes the sprockets and chain are due replacement very soon. I just wanted to wear the tyre out first though. Will tighten it up at weekend.

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I had a similar problem with my bike not going into gear, ended up being a loose chain. New chain and sprockets, sorted! No idea if yours could be the same thing but maybe worth checking? With mine I could get it into 1st and 2nd with a fight but the gear change lever wouldn't physically move at all to even try getting it into 3rd.

 

125's are quite susceptible to this, I've seen it happen to a DR125 and a Varadero 125. Tightened the chain up nice and tight and it worked like a dream again :)

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can I just ask. how is the chain got anything to do with the gears? surely it would change gears even without a chain? the chain is just a way to get power from the engine to the wheels?

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can I just ask. how is the chain got anything to do with the gears? surely it would change gears even without a chain? the chain is just a way to get power from the engine to the wheels?

 

This was confusing me too...

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I think a loose chain can cause backlash in the drive train....and basically b*ggers up the sychronisation of the meshing of the gears. Or at least that's how I understand it..... :wink:

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I think a loose chain can cause backlash in the drive train....and basically b*ggers up the sychronisation of the meshing of the gears. Or at least that's how I understand it..... :wink:

 

meshing... synchronisation ....this sounds expensive :?


will tightening it up fix it.

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I had a similar problem with my bike not going into gear, ended up being a loose chain. New chain and sprockets, sorted! No idea if yours could be the same thing but maybe worth checking? With mine I could get it into 1st and 2nd with a fight but the gear change lever wouldn't physically move at all to even try getting it into 3rd.

 

125's are quite susceptible to this, I've seen it happen to a DR125 and a Varadero 125. Tightened the chain up nice and tight and it worked like a dream again :)

 

It was my gsxr! :shock:

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Try the easy things first.....like tensioning the chain....and if that fails then look elsewhere. Is your oil level OK? Adjust the clutch cable free play, etc. If you can't get it into 1st can you get it into 2nd?

Try all this stuff first then post up if you're still having trouble and we'll see if we can help.

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Just had a quick look at my bike. The chain was so loose it jumped off the rear sprocket :shock:

 

:shock: :shock:


time for a new chain and sprockets by the sounds of it and time to start learning to check things the last thing you want is a chain wrapped around your leg it will take it off

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I knew it was loose I only adjusted it last month. But it seems to have hit a cliff edge and dropped off.


Any tips for getting old chain off, new one on. Any tool for the job?

Chain breaker and rivetter unless its got a split link (U clip style) link.

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How to change your rear wheel and sprockets (XmisterIS's unofficial guide - if in doubt, consult a professional!!)


What you will need before you start:


Don't start without this lot!!!


A paddock stand.

A torque wrench (NOTE - NEVER use a torque wrench to undo a nut. You will bugger up the torque wrench).

A standard wrench (i.e. non-torque).

A socket to fit the back axle nut.

A socket to fit the front sprocket nut.

A socket to fit the rear sprocket fastening bolts.

A spare lock washer for the front sprocket.

Knowledge of the torque settings for the front sprocket and axle nuts and the rear sprocket fastening bolts.

50cm of thick wood (e.g. a bit of old fence post).

New chain and sprockets (DID X-ring chain for the win!)

A chain breaker/riveter.

Angle-grinder to go through old chain - or on a 125 a pair of bolt cutters would probably do it.

A wooden hammer.


Make sure you have all the correct tools to do the job at the start, all layed out neatly. This is important, unless you want to be phoning your local bike shop to say, "help, I've buggered it up"!!


If in doubt, consult a qualified professional (that's what I do, anyway!)


Method:


Pop the bike up in the paddock stand.


Make sure the bike is in neutral.


Take off the sprocket cover.


Put the wood through the back wheel and against the swingarm so it can't rotate.


Use a pair of pliers to bend down the tab on the lock ring on the front sprocket (I had to pretty much destroy the tab on mine, hence the need for a spare lock washer!)


Use the standard wrench to slacken the sprocket nut.


Cut through the old chain using the angle grinder or bolt cutters and take the chain off.


Remove the sprocket nut and front sprocket.


Slacken off and remove the axle nut.


Support the rear wheel with the bit of wood underneath the tyre while you gently knock the axle out with the wooden hammer (or another bit of wood). Don't use a metal hammer, you might damage something. Be gentle!


Gently roll the rear wheel out so that the rear disc comes smoothly out of the rear calliper.


DO NOT PRESS THE REAR BRAKE WITH NO DISC IN THERE!!! NO NO NO NO NO!!!!


Lay the rear wheel down so you don't damage the disc. The best option is to lay it with its rim on two parallel bits of wood, with the disc "hanging" in the air in the middle - if you get what I mean.


Take off the rear sprocket.


You're now ready to fit the new chain and sprockets.


Fit the new front sprocket, followed by the new lock washer (or old one if it is still in good nick), followed by the nut. Tighten to finger tightness.


Fit the new rear sprocket to the back wheel. Tighten the bolts to the required toque setting.


Gently roll the back wheel into position on the bike, taking care to slide the disc back into the caliper.


Gently knock the rear axle back through with the wooden hammer.


Put the rear axle nut back on at finger tightness.


Thread the new chain through, double check that it is the right length. Remove links if it is too long. Count the number of links in the old chain. Then count the number of links in the new chain. Make sure they match. If the new chain is too long, you can take out the extra links (when I changed my chain and sprockets, I had to take three links out of the new chain).


When you are sure that the chain is the right length, use the riveting tool to put it together. DO NOT USE A SPLIT LINK!!!


Use the wood again to stop the back wheel from rotating, then tighten the front sprocket nut to the correct torque setting.


Bend down the tab on the lock washer.


put the sprocket cover back on.


Take the bike down off the paddock stand and put it on the centre stand or side stand.


Adjust the rear axle so that you have the correct amount of tension in the chain (1 inch of slack as a general rule).


Tighten the rear axle nut to the correct torque.


Take the bike for a spin round the block to make sure all is ok.


Check the chain all the way round after a couple of hundred miles, make sure it's ok, make sure everything is still tight, etc.

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Any recommendations for a riveter? I don't have an angle grinder. Could borrow one though. The guide I read said use riveter to remove pin after grinding the head off. Local charged £30 to remove rear wheel.

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Okay adjusted the chain...looks good for a few hundred miles. Shall I post a new thread on my chain question?


Basically the last owner gave me a chain it's a EK 520 SR....what does this mean? The chain on it now is a 428 V....what does this mean? I realise the number is the size. I think V means it's an O ring chain? Which are mega expensive. Do you advise I use the 520 chain or buy an O ring chain?


Also the rear sprocket on my bike now is KJM 54 but he gave me 46 tooth sprocket. Looking at the calculator that would mean;


17T 46T

Ratio = 2.71

Torque = -17.4%

Speed = +17.4%


Would it be that noticeable on a 125? I usually travel around at 55-60 to and from work. Seems its just going to take me longer to get there now.

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No I bought a new front separately standard 17 teeth.


I think the 520 chain is too big to go on my bike. Wemto only list 3 less teeth rear sprocket. I think a 17.4% dip in torque might be too much.

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I think the 520 would be too big actually I'm sure they use a 520 on some 600cc bikes!


If your unsure buy the correct size for your bike

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Anyone fancy a 520 chain cheap? :)


Found the right V o ring chain on ebay for £48 would this include the rivert link or need to be bought separately?


going by wemto a splint link is included, but everywhere advises using a rivert link...even on a 125?

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Anyone fancy a 520 chain cheap? :)


Found the right V o ring chain on ebay for £48 would this include the rivert link or need to be bought separately?


going by wemto a splint link is included, but everywhere advises using a rivert link...even on a 125?

 

Yeah because the split links are known for coming off, even on 125s.


The most powerful thing i'd dare use a split link on, would be a CG125.

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