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Disturbing article in the Telegraph, Saturday, April 7, 2012, about unsafe lay bys. The headline is: Highway of death: Clare Mann's safer lay bys campaign.


Government inertia sometimes prevents it from protecting its citizens. Safety and protection, of course, being the primary purpose of government.


I'm not singling out UK government, mind you. My own country and state gov'ts are more likely to explain why they can't do the right thing, than in just getting on with the job and making things better.

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Full article here


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/family/91806 ... paign.html


an image of the layby


http://www.eadt.co.uk/polopoly_fs/gb_012_motorway_lay_by_2_1_1338238!image/2419200956.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_490/2419200956.jpg


I do not like laybys unless they are separate from the road. That kind of layby is as safe as the hard shoulder, which is not a safe place to be.

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Thanks for the photo, Throttled.


Have you found the original news articles reporting on the crash? Is that where you found the photo? It helps in trying to imagine what that lay-by would have looked like to the driver approaching it in the dark.


Are hazard flashers required when vehicles are stopped in a lay-by?


What did the accident reconstructionist conclude was the cause of this accident? The lorry driver felt only a bump, which may suggest that excessive speed wasn't involved.

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I just googled 'Highway of death: Clare Mann's safer lay bys campaign' and looked at images.


I don't think they know, most obvious is falling asleep at the wheel.


No you would not need to put on your hazards there. But in the same way you do not if stopped on the hard shoulder, it is better to do so.

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Thanks for the photo, Throttled.


Have you found the original news articles reporting on the crash? Is that where you found the photo? It helps in trying to imagine what that lay-by would have looked like to the driver approaching it in the dark.


I'm attempting to find a picture for you via google maps. I know the type the lady in the article means but I'll attempt to find the exact one for reference


http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=a14+suf ... 24,,0,1.19


Are hazard flashers required when vehicles are stopped in a lay-by?


No, generally over here hazards are usually put on in a breakdown. That particular road is the major route to the port of Felixstowe, where you've got docklands and ferries transporting trucks back and forth to Europe as they make their deliveries. It's a 'dual carriageway' so the speed limit is 70mph for cars/bikes (though in practise people tend to go at higher speeds). The lorry would most likely be parked up on a designated legal break, and if he was stuck there for 9 hours as opposed to 15, 30 or 45 minutes, he would probably be tucked up asleep, so no lights on at all. For whatever reason, the car driver veered off the main carriageway, into the layby and into the back of the lorry.


What did the accident reconstructionist conclude was the cause of this accident? The lorry driver felt only a bump, which may suggest that excessive speed wasn't involved.

My other half who is a lorry driver tells me that even if the car hit the trailer at 70mph he wouldn't feel very much as it would absorb the impact. I'm not sure what the results of the inquest were. As Throttled said, it was late at night, early morning, the driver could have fallen asleep.

 

Edited to provide link.

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Thanks Nell, that has made it much clearer. You can see how a car could fail to negotiate the bend and just go straight into the back of the lorry.


I see the layby is marked as having an SOS phone. I would like to see it also marked as for emergencies only.

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...My other half who is a lorry driver tells me that even if the car hit the trailer at 70mph he wouldn't feel very much as it would absorb the impact.
I respect your other half's opinion, especially as I don't know what the weight of the lorry was. If I read the article right, it seems the lorry driver didn't even get out to investigate the cause of the bump, until the two passing motorists stopped for a look.


Thanks for the Google map scan. That's a helpful resource.

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...My other half who is a lorry driver tells me that even if the car hit the trailer at 70mph he wouldn't feel very much as it would absorb the impact.
I respect your other half's opinion, especially as I don't know what the weight of the lorry was. If I read the article right, it seems the lorry driver didn't even get out to investigate the cause of the bump, until the two passing motorists stopped for a look.


Thanks for the Google map scan. That's a helpful resource.

 

You're welcome :) I'm going on a limb here, but assuming the lorry was articulated, gross weight for UK articulated vehicles is 44 ton

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...My other half who is a lorry driver tells me that even if the car hit the trailer at 70mph he wouldn't feel very much as it would absorb the impact.

 


that i can believe a ton of car hitting 44 ton lorry would it even dent the back of a lorry lol

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