Jump to content

Basic maintenance


Guest Mike_Morgan
 Share

Recommended Posts

I dunno mate thats the problem :lol:


Im capable of servicing my car if that helps (plugs/leads/dizzy cap/rotor arm/brakes/oil/oil filter/coolant/rad change/fuel filter/air filter etc.


Im guessing on a bike I will need to know how to adjust chain, change chain and sprockets, plugs, leads, oil, coolant, brakes + fluid, filters etc


Anything else I have missed?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am servicing my GSX-R next week if ya wanna come over and make tea :D


Seriously though if ya fancy a trip over to matlock mate It shouldnt be an issue.

 

I would have to come between 21st dec and 7th jan if I were to get there cos thats when im back in the united kingdom of great britain :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Routine servicing is no more complicated than a car - sometimes can be a bit more fiddly changing plugs ...


And you'll have to take your fairing on and off to get at stuff - if it's a faired bike ...


If you can do stuff to a car, you shouldn't have much bother with a bike ...


Get yerself a Haynes manual too - they're handy ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its easier on a bike then it is a car


if you can do it on a car then on the bike you wont have a problem


chain is easy



find the tightest spot on the chain and adjust it that not sure how it adjsts on your bike but you will have to slacken the axle bolt and adjust it on both sides the same amount (usually marks on the swingarm ) have between 25 - 35 mm of play at the tightest point in the chain


once you adjust the chain tighten everthing back up and recheck the slack with some weight on the bike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think its a good idea Mike.... its better to watch someone, then have a go yourself, than trying to follow instructions on the forum.


I learnt loads off Stu n Stew over the summer. You're welcome to pop over mine at weekends and have a tinker :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Alternatively you could do what I do with my Yam.......


Take her to a dealers :wink:


After all you squaddies are on pop stars wages :lol:

 

Yes that is an alternative :lol:


I also like to know that whatever I put in/on my vehicle is good stuff. (Best oil/best plugs/best discs/pads etc...) I always fill up with Shell V Power or Tesco 99 fuels too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No Problem mate.


Right then first off, if you can service a car you can defo service a bike. I would get hold of a haynes manual, or any workshop manual and have a read through mate. For £20 it will give you all the basics and if have some spanner ability you can acheive pretty much all you need to.


Might be worth searching the net for some servicing tips too.


Me, the first thing I get after buying a bike is a manual so that I can start learning how it works, and what I need to service.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its easier on a bike then it is a car


if you can do it on a car then on the bike you wont have a problem


chain is easy



find the tightest spot on the chain and adjust it that not sure how it adjsts on your bike but you will have to slacken the axle bolt and adjust it on both sides the same amount (usually marks on the swingarm ) have between 25 - 35 mm of play at the tightest point in the chain


once you adjust the chain tighten everthing back up and recheck the slack with some weight on the bike

 


If its a suzi I wouldn't use the marks on the swingarm, just count the no of flats you turn the adjusters on each side to make sure they are the same, or use another method for checking the alignment (2 long bits of angle iron) the marks are usually out (well they are on gixers anyway).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last owner kindly gave me a Haynes manual with the bike. I havent read it yet and its back in England so I cant read it anyway.


Im not one for following instructions when it comes to service stuff. However, if I get shown things I can do it 'monkey see monkey do' (no jokes drew :wink: )


I think the main thing I would need the manual for is torque settings really.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can/if you've somewhere to put it, when you've learnt the ropes a bit, get yerself a bike lift -- they're great!!


If that's something you might do in the future, PM me at the appropriate time and I'll give you some advice about purchasing one ...


They do make servicing your bike loads easier! .. well, not easier as such, but less of a scrabbling around on the floor ball ache ..... and you'd score bonus points for 'best boys toys' ownership :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last owner kindly gave me a Haynes manual with the bike. I havent read it yet and its back in England so I cant read it anyway.


Im not one for following instructions when it comes to service stuff. However, if I get shown things I can do it 'monkey see monkey do' (no jokes drew :wink: )


I think the main thing I would need the manual for is torque settings really.

 

Sorry mate, but if Drew cant say it I will


MONKEY SEE MONKEY DO thats how all your training is done innit!!!!!!!!


phrases you never hear from the RMP "I can do monkey see monkey do"


Sorry mate, just could not resist the chance to through some banter at a scuffer (RAF version of monkey).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry mate, but if Drew cant say it I will


MONKEY SEE MONKEY DO thats how all your training is done innit!!!!!!!!


phrases you never hear from the RMP "I can do monkey see monkey do"


Sorry mate, just could not resist the chance to through some banter at a scuffer (RAF version of monkey).

 

Lol, well I was actually referring to the fact that RMP are referred to as monkeys by the rest of the Army :lol: I thought RAF Coppers were referred to as Snow Drops??? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know mate, I was trying to be subtle :roll: (should have said I did 10 yrs as a pongo before I transferred)


Yea snow drops is the nice name - similar to redcaps, scuffers is the more derogetory term more common in use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Anyone up for showing me basic maintenance on a bike over xmas? Stuff like the simple checks I need to do, lubricatin, chain etc...maybe even basic serviving. :D

 

Hi Mike,


While I was in the Army, most Camps had a Motorbike Club and you've normally got some REME fitters in the Club or other owners that can help you

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just read this post pm me your phone number i'm only in Warrington and usualy free most Sunday's


so its 2 tea bags and 4 sugars in a pint pot and some ginger nuts and we can go through the basics :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Welcome to The Motorbike Forum.

    Sign in or register an account to join in.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Please Sign In or Sign Up