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When do insurance companies disregard points and claims?


XmisterIS
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I have an SP30 on my licence, which I got in July 2010 and I have a claim in Feb 2012 (my fault - I reversed my car into a parked car and dented the bumper - yes, I was having a bad day!). When the SP30 comes off, I'll have a clean licence again.


Anyway, when do insurance companies disregard the claims and points? Is it four or five years? I think it used to be four ... but I have a suspicion that it has now increased to five (the cynic in me thinks that they do that just to get an extra year's worth of a little more money out of you ...)


I'm not too concerned, this is the first SP30 I've had in many years and I think it was a sneaky one - brand new 30 sign where there was a 40 the day before, and a hidden speed trap straight afterwards. Anyway, I digress. Back in the deliquency of my youth I accrued a total of 15 points in 4 years, mainly for driving my Mk1 Fiesta like the teenage/early-twenty-something lunatic that I was. (I.e. the kind of chav driver that nowadays I shake my head at tut at ... my mate and I used to have races in Tesco's car park ... :oops:)

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Accidents certainly go on the insurer - I used to insure my car with Admiral as they had the lowest threshold so my accidents dropped off.


As for other issues, no idea I'm afraid

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They always seem to ask "any claims or convictions in the last 5 years"

But that could be because they are a broker and some companies need 5years whereas others might only need 3 or 4.

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Anyway, when do insurance companies disregard the claims and points?

 

When you are no longer (statistically) a greater risk than anyone without points or accident history.


If they stop loading your premium too early, then the rest of us ALL have to pay towards your cover, which doesn't seem very fair to me. :wink:

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Anyway, when do insurance companies disregard the claims and points?

 

When you are no longer (statistically) a greater risk than anyone without points or accident history.


If they stop loading your premium too early, then the rest of us ALL have to pay towards your cover, which doesn't seem very fair to me. :wink:

 

Ah, but if you have points, but no accident history, then what would suggest you are capable of driving fast without accident.

Having accidents without points would suggest that even though you keep to the speed limits, you still crash...

Which would be the lowest risk?? :lol:

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Ah, but if you have points, but no accident history, then what would suggest you are capable of driving fast without accident.

Having accidents without points would suggest that even though you keep to the speed limits, you still crash...

Which would be the lowest risk?? :lol:

 

Both are higher risk than drivers and riders with no accident history and a clean licence, so both should attract a loading on their premium until such time as they are no longer considered a greater risk.


As I intimated in my earlier post, why should I pay extra to cover these people who are statistically more likely to initiate a claim due to their inability to either abide by the law or avoid an RTC?

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Both are higher risk than drivers and riders with no accident history and a clean licence, so both should attract a loading on their premium until such time as they are no longer considered a greater risk.


As I intimated in my earlier post, why should I pay extra to cover these people who are statistically more likely to initiate a claim due to their inability to either abide by the law or avoid an RTC?

 

Slightly harsh to assume you're better than anyone who's been in an RTC just because you've not had an accident.


I've got two that I need to declare to insurers (one down as a fault and one non-fault) and both were when the car was parked up and I wasn't in it.


Is that fair?

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Points are just an excuse for insurance companies to charge more.


If accident rates were related to speeding points, then they would operate some king of "No Points discounts".


Also, I've had loads of points in my time, but never had an own fault accident.

SpeedingPoints.JPG.f2a32f166d3e0758ec9fd9e71dac2ef7.JPG

Joes speeding points!

 

I've not changed my driving style, but don't get caught anymore due to hardly ever seeing a police car on the roads...

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most companies dont load your premium for just one speeding conviction providing it was the usual 3 points and £60 fine,but you have to tell them about it for 5 years normally even tho it doesnt count on your licence after 3 years,i got sp10 last june speeding in hgv 48 in a 40 limit 3 points £60 fine no increase in either car or bike insurance price

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Slightly harsh to assume you're better than anyone who's been in an RTC just because you've not had an accident.


I've got two that I need to declare to insurers (one down as a fault and one non-fault) and both were when the car was parked up and I wasn't in it.


Is that fair?

 

I didn't say or imply that I was better, only that I am cheaper to insure (statistically) than you or anyone else with points or an accident record.


Is that fair? Yep, it wasn't me that had your accidents so why should I be financially penalised?

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I didn't say or imply that I was better, only that I am cheaper to insure (statistically) than you or anyone else with points or an accident record.


Is that fair? Yep, it wasn't me that had your accidents so why should I be financially penalised?

 

Perhaps not, but I don't think you're statistically any less likely to have an accident than me and yet I get penalised.


You talk about 'avoiding an RTC' however on both occasions my car was driven into whilst parked. How could I avoid that?

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You talk about 'avoiding an RTC' however on both occasions my car was driven into whilst parked. How could I avoid that?

 

You could try parking offroad.


Maybe that's why insurance companies will often reduce premium for a vehcle parked on a private driveway.

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