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Evans waterless coolant review.


cockercas
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Swapped to the above so il start this and update as I use the bike.

Cost a £100 so wasn't cheap, £40 for prep fluid and £60 for the actual coolant.

You need to completely drain the system.


My bike with normal 50/50 run at 79*c

With evans it's still 79*c


I've only run the bike up the road a few miles.


It's not flammable like a few people suggest.


There's a lab report of this stuff on this site il see if I can add it here.

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79 degrees is the normal running temperature, which is controlled by the thermostat.....so, it doesn't matter what coolant you have in there, it'll still hit 79.

I think the difference these coolants can make is when you are riding at a lower speed and the airflow through the rad isn't enough to keep it at 79. As you say, the temp creeps up until the fan kicks in.......so, the idea of these coolants is to make the cooling system more efficient at these lower speeds and stop the fan kicking in so often.......and also to keep the engine a bit cooler when you're really caning it..... :wink:

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Yes, i thorght id put the operating temp in there because using the evans can increase it by up to 7ºc.

 


:?


so what is the purpose of using this coolant if it can increase the temp? the idea is to keep it cool :?

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your cooling system is designed to keep the engine at the correct temperature. if its too cold, the thermostat will stay closed, if its too hot, the fan will start up.

So if the waterless coolant cause the bike to run cooler, the thermostat will just stay closed for longer. if it runs hotter then the fan will kick in more... Without modifications to your cooling system its a waste of money IMO.

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I believe the main point of adding this stuff is two fold.


1.. its supposedly good for the life of the engine.. as long as it doesn't become contaminated with water. = no more coolant changes, ever. (see caveat below)

2.. it has a higher boiling point. 190c (compared to Hondas own which has a boiling point of around 130c)


its made from between 66% and 70% Ethylene Glycol plus Propylene Glycol plus inhibitors.


interestingly.. the MSDS sheet for this product actually states it contains water!! (MSDS = Material Safety Data Sheet) but.. doesn't state its %. so.. its not exactly waterless and kinda defeats the object. Im guessing it will have a limited lifespan.. but who can measure it with any surety?


http://i.imgur.com/U96Nk6v.png


Would I use it? no.


reason. My water cooled bike wasn't designed with this stuff in mind. and thats the end of it as far as I'm concerned.

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I've got some Engine Ice to try in the Speedy as the bike really doesn't like traffic or 30mph riding......so the hope is that this stuff will help the engine stay a bit cooler in these situations......needing the fan to come on less frequently.

Also.....it uses Propylene Glycol, which is much less harmful to the environment and animals than Ethylene Glycol.

This stuff is also diluted with water.....but apparently with ultrapure water, to remove any of the chemicals that can damage the cooling system on the bike..... :wink:

So, I'll see what difference it makes (if any) when I put it into the bike.

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Yes, i thorght id put the operating temp in there because using the evans can increase it by up to 7ºc.

 


:?


so what is the purpose of using this coolant if it can increase the temp? the idea is to keep it cool :?

 

Its ment to stop hot spots against the cylinder.

50/50 can turn to steam against the cylinder preventing it cooling properly.

Steam isnt good at getting rid of heat.


Im not defending this stuff. It could be complete crap. I wont know until next year.

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Cooling system is pressurised which increases the boiling point so reduces the chance of steam. If your water pump is running properly and your radiator and pipework isn't blocked, then the coolant will be flowing too quickly to boil on a hot spot and the system should dissipate the heat that's produced.

Dont forget that heat transfer takes a while to happen, that's why you can put your hand through a lit candle flame without burning your skin off.


Bikes aren't only built for UK climate, they will also run in scorching hot countries with no problems so if you have overheating problems in the UK there could be something wrong with your cooling system.

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Yes, i thorght id put the operating temp in there because using the evans can increase it by up to 7ºc.

 


:?


so what is the purpose of using this coolant if it can increase the temp? the idea is to keep it cool :?

 

Its ment to stop hot spots against the cylinder.

50/50 can turn to steam against the cylinder preventing it cooling properly.

Steam isnt good at getting rid of heat.


Im not defending this stuff. It could be complete crap. I wont know until next year.

 

yup I know all about hot spots and water boiling but on a road bike with a stock engine that keeps temp I can't see you needing this stuff


I think you have just wasted £100


I dont think you will see a difference without it been fully tested in a lab etc etc


But give it a go and see thats all you can do


you may prevent others from wasting money :)

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hence i started this thread, if its w**k and theres no noticeable difference then someone my benefit for reading this.


its only money, less then a days wage, plus id of had to buy coolant anyway so the full 100 isnt wasted.

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  • 4 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Bike was running at 104° on track the other day.

So i had to leave my fans on to cool it resulting in a flat battery.

Snapped a rad bracket so im going back to water and make sure it runs back at normal temp.

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  • 3 years later...

There are benefits to using this stuff.


Water in a cooling system is pressurised and with time parts such as hoses and the water pump deteriorate, the high pressure that builds up in the cooling system seeks out and finds holes and weak spots whereas this stuff is unpressurised and weak spots do not appear, this means the cooling system lasts longer and the machine is more reliable.


Also water dissolves iron and steel into rust, a car engine is far more susceptible than a motorbike engine however any steel parts in the system degrade with a water based coolant. This stuff is inert compared to water and steel parts are unaffected by it.


I would certainly consider using this for the extra reliability it offers to the cooling system.

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A classic solution looking for a problem......it actually allows the engine to run hotter and to reduce the pressure in the cooling system, you have to fit a recalibrated radiator cap. How many people do that? Spend the money on beer.

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http://www.lytron.com/Tools-and-Technical-Reference/Application-Notes/The-Best-Heat-Transfer-Fluids-for-Liquid-Cooling


Some reading here about thermal conductivity of water and glycol.


Plain old water is best but obviously low boiling point and corrodes the engines.

Have used Silkolene CCA in the dyno cooling system

https://www.opieoils.co.uk/p-819-silkolene-pro-cca-ultra-motorbike-cooling-system-corrosion-inhibitor.aspx

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