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Module 1.. Is it time for an attempt?


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Hi all,


So I've been riding since November of last year (my first bike) so roughly four months, one of my aims from the start before I even invested in a 125 was to get an A2 license, originally I wanted to wait, get the license and then have a better choice of bike, insurance costs bought me down to earth so now stuck with getting on the roads and gaining some experience before going for further training, originally I was going to use my due tax refund to get my license out of the way.. that's taking longer than expected so have a bit of a dilemma.


Saving the money isn't a problem and nor is time my CBT/Theory is still valid for at least another year and a half.. I was emailing a training school that offers one day of training with bike and gear included for £150 and then they do the test at the end of the same day to prevent further costs incurring, so basically £150 + (Mod 1 - £15-16, Mod 2 - £75), it's location is about ten minutes away from part of my usual commute and I've seen the training school bikes out and about on my usual route.. so not completely out of my comfort zone in terms of location.


I keep investing similar amounts of money into bike gear or electrical items instead of getting my license out the way witch in honesty would leave me completely stress free with only insurance costs to worry about in the future, anything else is a choice.


So do I attempt to do a module 1 and test all in one day without any experience outside of a 125cc, I've commuted all through winter and in all weather and times of day for a few months and feel that I've gained a good understanding of controlling my bike, I have the confidence just not in my bike as it continues to impress me with its ever changing reliability.


I've read that Mod 1 is much harder than Mod 2 so what route do I take, I just think that if I can afford to buy a expensive helmet etc as I'm currently in the middle of why don't I put my shopping list on hold and get the casting shadow from over my head.


Suggestions, is one day far to short and a gamble?

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Don't attempt anything until you've had professional tuition. You can't assume that your experience on the road will translate onto the mod 1 test pad, it's a totally different beast. In some cases I imagine it will make it worse and be counter productive. You need to book in with a school, get some experience with them at their base. Most schools also have access to the real test pad when it's not being used for testing so you can do the real thing as part of your training.

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You need to book in with a school, get some experience with them at their base.

 

The costs mentioned above are with a training school.. it's one day of training for £150 and then the test at the end of the day (prices above), so all in all a day's training (with a training school) and the test module 1 = £165 (aprox).


My questioning is, is one day of training and a test at the end to much.. it's a very tempting price point and if I'm going to invest in items of similar price continuously I might as well make a sensible investment.

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People pass their test off straight after CBT, it's not unheard of. I imagine you'd be fine, then again I don't know how you ride and what your nerves are like.

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I never had a 125 apart from when I was a kid.

So I was realistically off bike for 20 odd years.

Did the cbt. Then went straight onto the tests.

just do it.

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Might be worth practicing in a car park though mod 1 can be a bugger.. Only because the littlest things will make you fail.


Go to a carpark of a supermarket sunday at 5pm when its empty. and do some figures of eight, u-turns, slaloms and swerving. You'll look insane but it helps to have some experience before you go at it.


Also don't forget the simplest thing.. Shoulder checks before everything! :D

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Might be worth practicing in a car park though mod 1 can be a bugger..


Go to a carpark of a supermarket sunday at 5pm when its empty. and do some figures of eight, u-turns, slaloms and swerving. You'll look insane but it helps to have some experience before you go at it.

 

Did this not long after I got my bike when I wanted to attempt countersterring for the first time, rocked up before work early one sunday morning and started using the lampposts dotted around.. god knows what anyone who saw me must of thought.


All in all I'd say the U-Turn looks like the hardest one to practice for just because I live on a slanted downhill so whenever I've tried it before I just end up turning the bike with around with my feet because it's easier.


Also I don't know if I'd trust the results of practising on my 125 as a real result of if I was capable as the throttle can be a little jerky, me and the clutch have never got on and 1st gear is so tiny that it should be a crime, I'd like to think that practising on something than would inspire me with more confidence would enable me to learn properly, although I'll attempt a few of the above before hand and see how I get on.


Thanks.

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Problem is getting used to the larger bike to manouver and also thr clutch will be completely different a lot more clutch control is needed on a bigger bike, on a small bike you can be off the clutch crawling along but to get the same speed on a bigger bike you need to be slipping it.

Foryour mod 1 not only is it the test part but getting to and from the test center as most schools will escort you there on their bike (unless you have a suitable machine to meet them there with)


Slow control to get tight controlled turns leanthe opposite way to counter the weight this allows you to carry less speed as when you steer in you need momentum to keep you up otherwise

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Foryour mod 1 not only is it the test part but getting to and from the test center as most schools will escort you there on their bike (unless you have a suitable machine to meet them there with)

 

I'd assume they'd just put the bikes in a van and drive there, although wouldn't feel exactly against the idea of riding the bigger bike their.. some sneeky module 2 practice, as a final choice I'd have my 125 if all else fails.


I think I'll try a few of the manurers on my 125 but just to ensure I can do them.. I think I'd rely on the training schools "one day of training" to get me up to speed and teach me all I need to know, all in all the way I see it Module 1 is basically a more intensive, serious CBT on a more powerful bike, I'm just putting a lot of trust into the school to be able to get me test standard in a few hours.

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Update; Just spoke to the insurance company (MCE) and she wanted to know what date I'd gain the license, obviously explained that it was hard to judge because you have to pass one to pass another.. gave a rough date of may 1st at the latest (considering I want to attempt the mod 1 soon).


Turns out I struck gold brings the premium down by £24.79 and would only require a £15.71 payment to add that information with the policy, that's including the admin fee.


She did say that quote would only be valid for the next 7 days, obviously I couldn't take it out as tempting as it is because you cant predict the future and could cost more if I was or wasn't to gain the license earlier or latter.


Aalthough I think the payments stay the same (as I pay monthly )as they've taken that reduction of the admin fee by the sounds of it, so all in all £15.71, result in comparison to the £40 for a front sprocket adjustment I paid :popcorn:

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As mentioned above, riding a bigger bike is a big difference.


It was doubly hard in my case as it was the first time riding in like 4 months after my off and broken wrist, Was sore by the end of that day!!!


Out of all the obstacles i found the swerve test hardest, as you have to do between 31-33 (ish) and dodge a cone about half a meter out, doesn't sound hard but it can be! U-turn is easy just crane your neck round and look where you want to stop you'll naturally go there. Also get used to manual handling can be quite tricky if the bike is heavy for you (don't know how strong you are?) but if you hold it right it should be a breeze! I think i wrote a basic guide on the Mod 1 here somewhere will try dig it out it might be of assistance =)

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Manual moving - push bike so center of balance is middle so you're not struggling with the weight, straighten handle bars, push back to edge of the cone, look left and right then carry on, turn straighten and then at the right time turn again before crossing the "path" check left and right and move the bike into the "garage" simple. stand next to the bike do not get on untill instructed.

Slalom - Easy enough with practice, High revs and play with the clutch don't look at the cone you passed, or the one you're going to, look at the next one and the bike should go good as gold.

figure of 8 - bit harder, go around and as soon as you pass the middle -->8 turn your head right the other way, same again once you pass back around, naturally the bike will go where you're looking (obviously you still have to steer somewhat) again, high revs play with the clutch and if you're going to fast use the REAR brake only. keep going untill he says to stop.

Slow riding - Easy one to do, just look far ahead and keep it slow, if you're going to fast rear brake.

U-turn - One most people fail on. I understand why, i took ages to get this down. You need to look RIGHT over your shoulder and turn the bike slowly. Go quite a way down (you have something like 5-10 meters to play with) this gives you plenty of time to straighten up when you come around. You don't have to pull off and immediately turn, take your time just don't forget to keep revs high. and don't pass that line.

speed test - Simple one for checking you can hit the right speed. no way to fail unless you fall off.

emergency stop - I think someone on here failed this the other day. Take it steady get used to how the bike feels at speed and what it sounds like at 31mph so you can FOCUS on the instructor. when he waves his board, off the throttle squeeeeeze the front brake untill you feel it bite (WITH ALL FOUR FINGERS!) then pull it in slowly enough so you don't lose control, at the same time gently apply the rear brake, not to tough you don't want to lose control or skid (fail town that is) do NOT pull the clutch in untill you have practically stopped you will stop slower also i believe it is a minor. put your foot down once you stop if you stalled it no biggy start the bike up first gear shoulder checks and move on back to the instructor unless he has walked to you.

hazard avoidance - My worst enemy i found. It's hard to get the right speed up and move at the same time but after about an hour of practice i nailed it. Get your speed up and come toward the cone at a SLIGHT angle, push down on the right bar and the bike should lean past the cone as soon as you pass it push on the left and the bike will straighten up. stop at the designated point and await further instructions.


I don't think i've missed any, nudge me if i have.


Things to remember:

-Shoulder checks EVERYWHERE, you pull off, both shoulders. You get on the bike, both shoulders. you park the bike, guess what... BOTH SHOULDERS. i might be going over the top but better to check than him fail you for "No observation".

-Be calm, hard to do on the test but breath and chill, count to 5 and you'll relax a little stiff muscles make slow manouvers hard as hell.

-High revs on slow manouvers and play with the clutch you'll be a low smoother and more steady

- Don't use the front brake on slow manouvers you'll be jumpy and potentially fall off / put your foot down

- When listening to the instructor lift your visor up and keep your RIGHT foot on the brake your LEFT on the floor and BOTH HANDS on the bars

- Smile and shake the instructors hand, they're people make them feel like you appreciate their time and effort, they might just ignore that little mistake..

 

Found it, This is just my experience however, you may find it slightly different.

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Found it, This is just my experience however, you may find it slightly different.

 

Thanks, I gave it a quick read through and have taken some mental notes, times much appreciated.


After a comment about the clutch control being different on a bigger bike as opposed to my 125 honestly the base case scenario to practice for the test is do it in a controlled environment with a trainer, as much as doing it before hand on my 125 would teach me the general rule of thumb it doesn't mean it would be any where near the same experience considering power and weight differences.


There's a plus and a minus with the way that I plan to do it, ultimately i'm going in without any expectations and using the first training / attempt at Mod 1 as a way to gain experience.. I might as well pay an extra £15.50 at the end of the day to attempt the real thing rather than another £150 to include an extra days training, leaves me less time to get worried and think about things and also will ensure all training is fresh in my head.


I just hope their training isn't cheap for all the wrong reasons :lol:

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At the end of the day, training in a car park will prepare you for HOW to do the manouvers, it's one less thing to think about when taking the test as you'll be more used to them. Then it's just getting used to the bikes weight.

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Looks like training on an empty car park it is, they're still the cheapest company to go with but after a quick phone call (a day and a half passed with no email response to my inquiry) it turns out that the original information I was provided with wasn't correct, they require you to do at least a day and a half worth of training before you can sit your Module 1 test.


Originally it worked out at £165.50 .. a very reasonable price.

Now it's more like.. £250.50



And the end of April is the earliest available dates for tests to be set.


1 Step forward 10 steps back :shock:

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Birmingham


I've just started this post;

viewtopic.php?f=47&t=56237&p=880075#p880075


Strongly considering using my 125 to go for an A1 and then getting a full A when I'm 24.. can't justify those prices.

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Being limited to a 125 you'll get fed up soon enough, trust me.. Ideally a 250-300 is a good to ride for a while. But what ever you can afford =) Good luck either way!

 

I sense as much, although it does now enable me with a estimated budget to attempt to start saving for if ever I wanted to change to a different 125, Honda CBF, Yamaha YZF etc.. all second hand of course, for now I'll stick with one step at a time.


I guess you could call it a short term sacrifice to allow for more enjoyment in my mid 20's going into my 30's (if I'm still riding by then).. hopefully doing my A1 license now and having a "full license" on record for 4-5 years will make upgrading to a bigger bike a piece of cake in terms of insurance as opposed to what it would after only my first year on the roads, all for the future.


Also £100 for both tests if passed first time v's £250.50 for one attempt and not a guaranteed pass, have to weigh up the options and go with the better one for me personally, I could also resit both tests and still come out having spent less money than the above.


Thanks, although it's at the end of the month I'll be sure to make a post or something along the lines :thumb:

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