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Anyone changed careers over the age of 30?


wannars125
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Wondering if anyone can help - my head's in a right mess at the moment!


So the short version if you don't want to read below is that I'm not 100% happy in my current job, it pays a decent enough salary and I don't think a move to another company would make any difference so thinking about retraining to go into the aviation industry and want to know if anyone has done something similar at my age (I'm 33) and with a family and mortgage to keep up?


And now the long version:


I'm considering a career change but don't know if it's the right thing to do. I currently work as an IT manager on a decent enough salary (I won't say how much exactly but it puts me just into the 40% tax bracket). I'm not 100% happy in my current role though and have considered similar roles at other companies but I just think it'll be the same stuff just in an unfamiliar environment. I also have a fair amount of freedom in my job to dictate my daily work and hours.


I got to thinking and always had a passion for aviation and thought it might be worth going into the industry. I've had a look at the routes in and I've found a btec part time at a local college that would lead to an aeronautical engineering degree at the same college. There are quite a few companies locally that provide work although I specifically want to get into aircraft maintenance or the air accident investigation bureau the latter which I've heard is quite difficult to get into.


The main reason for thinking about a complete change are being closer to home and being able to spend more time with family. The wages are fairly similar from what I can gather unless you become senior in which case the wage could go up fairly dramatically at least for aircraft maintenance engineers. I wouldn't be able to relocate for work though so it would be putting everything on finding a job locally. If I couldn't then it would be a waste of time and money.


I don't know if it's the right thing to do though as I can provide pretty well for my family at the moment and I know if I stayed doing what I do now I could have a fairly good lifestyle.


Any advice much appreciated!

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I guess weigh up the pros and cons, do your research and see how it falls.


I had a career change in my late 20s to a completely different field using the 'blag it' method. I started at the bottom (again) and worked my way up. It was easier for me as I was a singlie at the time.


I'd just say that money isn't the be all and end all - I took a big hit on wages ~50% which wasn't great but I was able to adapt my lifestyle to work with it. The gamble paid off and now I'm doing pretty well. If you've got an understanding other half who's behind you, there's no reason why you shouldn't seriously consider it.


Going in to the field you're looking at, have you seen if there are any companies that offer a day release type arrangement? That way you get a foot up by working in the field and get your tuition paid. :-)

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I was faced with a similar dilemma at 32 yr old.

I was being made redundant and was seriously thinking about a total change in career.

In the end I chose not to, for the simple reason I couldn't afford to.

Re training sounded a good idea but the starting at the bottom didn't.

9 years later I do sometimes regret it but that's life.

You really just need to weigh up all the options and see if you can still afford to live like you do now or are prepared to make sacrifices.

(I only really regret not re training on shifts like now on a Sunday night )

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I 'changed' twice in my 40's and I am just about to change again (I'm now over 60).


Work out what your minimum survivable income is - Anything more than that as a wage is workable. Talk to your local employers in the industry to want to get into - They may be able to offer an apprenticeship or, they may even offer to bring you in and provide access to day-release college (or night school). At the very least, they will be able to advise your best optiions.


You could move into IT 'consultancy' work - Part Time, in order to keep an income while you re-train for Aircraft Engineering but this is not a quick route!


Good luck!


:cheers:

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I tried to change,


I went from working in a bank to being a personal trainer at the age of 30 which i was absolutely papping myself over.


I saved as much as i could to live off for a while and decided that i would assess the situation of how i was doing after 6 months, turns out PT'ing in a club wasn't for me, loved training with clients but the ridiculously long hours coupled with long periods of hanging about in the middle of the day (which i knew about and thought i could cope with), i was running myself into the ground and my life was just work 24/7.


I decided that i would start applying for jobs again and went back to banking for a different bank i managed to blag an extra 9k a year over what i was being paid and the new place is 15 minutes down the road, i also PT in my spare time and its a lot more enjoyable for me, i just decided i need the steady wage coming in to feel secure.


If i hadnt risked it and taken the jump i would of always asked myself what if? Lifes a gamble and not every gamble pays off however do you always want to wonder what would have happened if you didnt just go for it??


Its a scary decision to make but worth it if it will make you happy. I say go for it :thumb:

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What about contracting?


I'm a UX designer so work a lot in techie industry as well. I considered switching careers as well last year because staying in one place as a cog in the machine was driving me nuts. Now I'm a ltd contractor I get a great variation of projects, new people (sometimes like an old boys club, I see the same faces on different projects which is great!) pay is obviously better than I'd ever have gotten as a permie and everything I do impacts my business growth.


Don't know what kind of IT you do but my old landlord was an IT contractor and loved it. He worked from home to be around family more and was on a good screw to boot.


Going it alone is the best thing I ever did (so far so good, touch wood!) but isn't for everyone. It's nerve racking but once you make the leap and get the first project under your belt it soon gets easier. I was out of work for 3 months when I started which was a nightmare, but once I got going it's all good.


So in summary - same role that you know well and are good at, with a twist.

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Yep, totally agree. I couldn't stand being permie with all the hoops you have to jump through, appraisals, promises of payrises and bonuses that dont materialise and only a few weeks holiday per year. So ive been contracting for years. Zero politics, I work only with people I want to work with and I take nice breaks between contracts.

Pay is much better too.


My advice would be to get into financial IT. London is easily commutable from where you are and it pays better than outside of London.

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all things being even go for it ....but


I have a managerial position same place for 17 years


I met and married a motorcycle instructor and a couple of interesting opportunities came our way if we would work as a husband and wife instructing team.


So at the age of 39 I started to train after work 1 to 1 with an ex police rider to get to Cardington test standard

the hours were crippling with the training and full time , I was doing 80 odd hours a week but I didn't want to jack my job until we had strapped down the offers..


Long story short my wife contracted cancer and sadly passed away within 12 months and I was left as a single parent with 2 daughters and man was I glad of my boring office job and the good standing I had built with years of hitting my marks ,leaving to instruct full time would have been disastrous for me and my family


Sorry for the downer but shit really does happen

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I worked in IT for years and worked for a major bank but got so sick of it that I was like you. I quit my job at age 35 and went back to University, did a degree then teacher training and after taught A' levels. I've had a life-time of crappy jobs I hated. Please let me advise you from experience - chose something you'll love, make written plans and then go for it. My ex worked as a stewardess on an airline but it's such a competitive industry and they are so demanding as employers. She hated it and left after a year. It depends what you want to do. Do have a second choice just in case.

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all things being even go for it ....but


I have a managerial position same place for 17 years


I met and married a motorcycle instructor and a couple of interesting opportunities came our way if we would work as a husband and wife instructing team.


So at the age of 39 I started to train after work 1 to 1 with an ex police rider to get to Cardington test standard

the hours were crippling with the training and full time , I was doing 80 odd hours a week but I didn't want to jack my job until we had strapped down the offers..


Long story short my wife contracted cancer and sadly passed away within 12 months and I was left as a single parent with 2 daughters and man was I glad of my boring office job and the good standing I had built with years of hitting my marks ,leaving to instruct full time would have been disastrous for me and my family


Sorry for the downer but shit really does happen

 

Bless you, sorry to hear that lovely and glad your job continued to work out for you x

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Thanks for the replies all. Good to hear of peoples different experiences.


I've considered doing the contracting thing as it would be a hell of a lot more money but the lack of stability makes me worry. Also, it would still mean commuting to London. I work in Legal IT which is nearly if not just as lucrative as working in the finance industry.


I think I'm going to do a bit more research into what it really is that I want to specialise in then make a definitive decision. The other thing is that I'll be needing to contract over the summer hols whilst studying which should keep me up to date so I can always go back to it if all else fails.


Bigralphie, sorry to hear about your situation mate.

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Dont worry about stability. Most contracts have a one month notice period so apart from the lack of sick pay and holiday pay, its as stable as many permie jobs but just pays a lot better.

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After all my working life in warehousing I was made redundant at the age of 46 in 2009- went to uni for 3 years and now have a degree in Wildlife Biology. Currently working at a school as a Science Technician (fun job- awful place!) Had an interview today as a warden at a local nature reserve which is really what I want to do (which I don't think I will get).

It has been a very challenging and stressful few years in many ways and it's tough trying to get a job that I would really love but I have never regretted the decision to try to change my career path- even if it hasn't worked out quite as planned so far.

Basically what I am saying is go for it if that is really what you want. It may not work out but as you sit in your retirement home at least you can say you gave it a shot

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