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Chinese bikes - are they actually any good?


Jacko
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<t>Should I buy Chinese or other brand?</t>  

23 members have voted

  1. 1. Should I buy Chinese or other brand?

    • Chinese
      3
    • More popular brand.
      16
    • Other (please specify)
      4


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Hey all ,

I'm looking to do my CBT soon, and wanting to get on the road asap. In an effort to minimise costs, I am looking at the possibility of getting a Chinese bike, so that the money saved can go on better kit. :D

So I was wondering, are they actually any good, or am I better off saving some more and getting a better known brand?


Edit: added a poll

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Please not again. There are so many previous threads on this subject with so many excellent in depth responses . Surely everyone with an opinion for or against must have expressed it at least once by now. Just saying.

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Okay, i will look round for more information. Thanks for your reply (still new to TMBF) and I appreciate your patience :)


Is there an option to close this topic?

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:lol: :lol: You've just opened Pandora's Box mate....... :lol: :lol:


Personally I'd go for a secondhand Japanese 125.....or consider doing your DAS and getting something bigger......but that's just my opinion..... :wink:

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Nothing wrong with a 125 in your forties, I love mine.


I think when it comes to a Chinese 125, you could be on a hiding to nothing unless you are:

A) capable of extensive maintenance yourself;

B) fully prepared for the fact that unless you want it to fall apart within six months you are going to need to replace, as soon as possible, a minimum of:

1) the tyres

2) the exhaust

3) the battery

4) every bulb or LED unit

5) every single screw, bolt and washer

C) comfortable with your understanding of how to change oil, how to tighten the chain, how to clean and regularly ACF the thing and put it under a roof or at least under a water proof cover every night.


Now there is, vaguely, an argument that you won't need to do all of the above immediately, which means if initial price point is your primary barrier to entry and you are comfortable with the later investments for stainless steel rather than chocolate that many of these components initially come with then it could be OK. Not great, it's never going to be amazeballs, but it might work out ok if you're prepared to learn with a spanner and put the hours in to do all the extended ongoing maintenance that you're going to need.


Ultimately it's up to you, if you have the time and the inclination and it's the only way you'll get a ride then maybe it could be for you, but personally it's not for me. Up to you mate, it's your money, just be prepared for some weird problems along the way and be prepared to spend a fair bit as you go along to keep it on the road. Long term you won't really save any money, especially taking into account depreciation, but initially it might get you started.


Good luck next keep us informed! :) :cheers:


*edit* oops, forgot spark plug, definitely one of the first things to change apparently.

Edited by Picollus
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:lol: :lol: You've just opened Pandora's Box mate....... :lol: :lol:


Personally I'd go for a secondhand Japanese 125.....or consider doing your DAS and getting something bigger......but that's just my opinion..... :wink:

 

:stupid:

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Get a Chinese bike and learn your legal rights and ensure the dealer you buy it from fixes every single problem under warranty just as they are legally obligated to do...

You will get enough use from the bike to get to your big bike test

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I'd say spend more on the bike and less on the kit, there are plenty of cheap makes like spada that nonetheless make decent enough gear.


Buying a Chinese bike is definitely a false economy I reckon, spend a bit more on a looked-after Japanese 125 and you'll be able to sell it on when you're ready to move up to a bigger bike :thumb:

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Is the OP planning on filling with premium fuel then undertaking while wearing an open flip lid? I think that could have a bearing on recommendations given.


It's probably best if we avoid all talk of oil type and riding without a jacket for the moment.

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This thread is inspiring me. I could do with a project, maybe I could pick up a cheap Chinese bike and see exactly what it would take to make it an acceptable ride.... hmm... might make for a fun blog :lol:

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This thread is inspiring me. I could do with a project, maybe I could pick up a cheap Chinese bike and see exactly what it would take to make it an acceptable ride.... hmm... might make for a fun blog :lol:

Been tempted to do the same..

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Some of these people have never owned a Chinese made motorcycle.

Now in answer to your question, depends how much you want to spend!

A Chinese bike will last for a few years, I rode a 4 year old one from Colchester to King's Lynn for someone who had never ridden a geared bike before and had done his CBT and commuting on a scooter (he had a fleet bike, which was a Honda Melody 110cc horrid thing, tiny and he is over 6 ft, looked like a gorilla on a kids scooter).


The maintenance this bike had received was not good, though it had an MOT it needed several repairs for it's next MOT, these included new front caliper, new front fork leg, new chain, new sidelight bulb. But it did pass and it did enable him to save enough cash to blow it on a Hyosung 125cc V twin (being the size and weight of a gorllia the V twin has more torque and gets him up to speed quicker). Cost him £150! It did have Pirelli tyres on...


My wife was impressed by the noodle bike and bought one of her own. A man in Norwich had one as an operation meant he could not move a heavy bike, so wanted a light bike to pootle around on whilst he recovered. A Zontes Monster fitted the bill nicely with a sale price at the time of about £800. He bought it and when he had recovered he went to get a CB500, the local Honda dealer (Balls) offered him £100 trade in or a £500 discount for no trade in, so he went for the no trade in option, he sold the year old bike for £300! My wife was more than happy to pay that for it and I rode it home. Now this was on the standard Chinese made tyres, the roads were damp and a little greasy, but the little beast gripped well.


I rode it home at it would do 65mph, down hill, wind behind you, just. Happiest at 50mph, so I sat behind a caravan all the way to King's Lynn and just pootled it back.


She who must be obeyed then decided that bikes were not for her at this moment (again) and sold it to a local dealer who does sell Chinese bikes, for £450...


In the meantime I had fun on it, riding it to and from speedway meets (40 miles each way), averaged over 110 mpg too! It worked well, apart from the headlight bulb, which on the only time I rode it back and night lost main beam and the dipped beam was not enough to see 20ft in front of you, corrosion on the bulb terminals you see, wet and dry and ACF 50 sorted it out nicely. The throttle cable also snapped, fortunately less than a mile from home. Luckily there is a motorcycle shop in the village I live in, ok it is for speedway bikes but they they have throttle cables too, so a Venhill cable was purchased and fitted, that bugger won't burn through in a hurry. The throttle cable is routed directly over the top of the cylinder and the brake cable from a push bike they use as a throttle cable just ain't up to the job. Venhill cables are!


Those were the only problems we had with the little beast and I was quite sorry to see it go, however she did invest the money in a Honda NTV for me, vroom!

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ive had a Chinese loncin a 107 Honda innover clown had it three years now , parts are cheap , given me no problems , but its serviced and checked over weekly , done 7000 miles now ,

depends on the make and your attitude to maintenance

if you look about you will see Chinese bikes every were have a word with there owners see what they have to say

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I purchased a zontes tiger, did me very well for the two years I had it, even had a road trip on it, down to great yarmouth and back, roughly 322 miles in all. Only got rid cox I went onto pass my DAS and bout a bigger bike. Sold my zontes to a neighbour whom uses it to commute to and from work.

hasn't given him any issues and thats about 3 years ago now.

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ive had a Chinese loncin a 107 Honda innover clown had it three years now , parts are cheap , given me no problems , but its serviced and checked over weekly , done 7000 miles now ,

depends on the make and your attitude to maintenance

if you look about you will see Chinese bikes every were have a word with there owners see what they have to say

Clown ? do you mean clone ?

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