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To all you Rideout Virgins!!!!!!! Please Read


houdini
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Okay this is how it goes.


This is a club, you are a member of this club, same as me same as the next member. We all had our 'first time out' to meet the rest of the club, for me it was a fab day, great new roads and even better people there waiting to meet me. I didnt know Rennie, Yorbandit, Keith, Techno or any of the "regulars" beforehand. I met them by purely clicking yes, Im coming along to one.



Now, whether you joined yesterday or a year ago, you have that entitlement. With so many members wouldnt it be fantastic to have a massive turnout, but it does take you to join in. No pressure, just wanted to clarify as I just saw a post asking "can I join in?", therers no need to ask; we as a collective want you to meet the rest of the loonies.


Regardless of machine, turning up on a bike is better than a car obviously but if you cant then still come, its what keeps the club vibrant and fresh.


Okay rant over but just remember those that do have a great time and those that dont, well your missing out for no reason.




:thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:

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Group hugs are also a team event but they are not compulsory, despite what the 'Rear Hugger' might tell you.


Seriously, though, what Hou says is true - get off your arsh and on your bike and make a meet or three.


You can put names and even zits to faces and make new friends into the bargain.

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great new roads and even better people there waiting to meet me.

 

stop turning up late then :lol:


keep an eye on the ride out sections, some people travel a long way to come to meets....


when the sun comes out we will be all over the place...

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You can put names and even zits to faces and make new friends into the bargain.

 

:laugh: :laugh:


Speaking from the "Newbie to rideout's" group, I will say I 100% agree with what is being said. We should meet up, and when I came to the pudding run the other week, I had a great time, even though I was quiet as a mouse. I can say honestly that the people on here are a great bunch.


My concerns are that I am not only a newbie to rideouts, but a newbie to bikes as well. Since passing my test I have less than 10 hours riding experience. For that reason I worry about causing an accident in a group.


I am also concerned about the speed in which I travel. I hate to say this, but I don't tend to break speed limits apart from dual carraigeways and motorways (And apart from a bit of testing of my bike yesterday, only a few miles an hour above on those roads as well). I don't want to be holding people up who have come out for a fast rideout who have to keep stopping and waiting for people like me to catch up at every junction. I have been told a few times on here that people don't mind this, but I don't like putting people out if possible.


Lastly I don't know much about group riding *HINT HINT*. Perhaps someone could do a write up and explain the principles behind group riding safety for us newbie types. :D

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Lastly I don't know much about group riding *HINT HINT*. Perhaps someone could do a write up and explain the principles behind group riding safety for us newbie types. :D

 

There are many pages of info on the etiquette of group riding.


Try this, it's easier>


Ride normally as if you are in traffic, it's just that the traffic happens to be bikes.


By that I mean treat everyone else as an assassin out to get you and avoid making contact at all costs.


And remember;


Your wrist controls your throttle; your brain controls your wrist.

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As far apart as possible without getting left behind :lol:


Most rideouts, and certainly those that I have led, use the mirror method.


The leading rider keeps the following one in their mirrors at all times, or at least as much as is practicable.


That way, if anyone drops off they are soon spotted and the whole column can slow down or stop as need be.


The leader also has to be aware of ability in his group and can't take a one bike overtake if he's leading four riders, make allowances for traffic lights catching the tail enders etc., etc.

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usually in a big meet we split into 3 groupd,


1 a fast group

2 a medium pace group

3 a slow group


usually its a case of common sense when it comes to distance between bikes, if you follow the rule, always be able to stop in the space you can see ahead you will be ok....


and dont worry about holding the group up, just go with the group you feel comfortable with, and nobody minds waiting for people to catch up...the main point of a meet is to meet people not loose them....

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From a riding web site


1) Ride Your Own Ride


Don't ride in the wheeltracks of the bike in front! If he stops suddenly, you might not! Ride staggered to one side where you can safely close up such as wide, fast roads or in traffic (this makes the group shorter and more compact, so it takes up less room on the road, discouraging car drivers from trying to insert themselves into the group). On narrow twisty roads, sit back and observe the two second rule (four seconds in the wet).


Don't simply follow the guy in front blindly! Your eyes are drawn, as if by magnet, to the bike in front. He speeds up, you speed up. He slows down, you slow down, he cocks up, you follow him over the cliff etc.. If you need to, drop right back and give yourself space. It takes a lot of practice to be able to ignore the rider in front and concentrate on the road for yourself, picking your own speeds, braking points, lines and most importantly dealing with hazards for yourself.


This also applies if the rider behind catches you up - by all means move aside and let him overtake, but make sure you only do it where it is safe. Hold your line where there are bends, junctions or other vehicles - it is upto the guy following you to overtake safely, not for you to make things easy for him.


2) Ride at Your Own Pace


A frequent problem of riding with other riders is that you try to keep up either with the rider in front or you find you are pushing to stay ahead of the rider behind. In common with riding too fast in general you start to suffer tunnel vision. As you begin to get anxious, you stop scanning ahead and to the sides, stop looking ahead round bends, over hedges etc, spotting the line of telegraph poles, trees etc.. In short, you concentrate on the next bend and you fail to get an overview ahead of the road, so you are not planning ahead. Things like an S bend can catch you out. You also fail to see situations to the side of you, like cars approaching a crossroads from a side road, road signs warning of bends or junctions etc. The moment things start to surprise you and scare you, slow down!


3) Don't hassle other riders


OK, you're faster than the guy in front. You'd like to pass him and enjoy the ride. Sit well back and wait for a safe overtaking opportunity! If he's half on the ball, he'll spot you in the mirror, and move aside to let you pass. Don't hassle him, inexperienced riders will often try to let you past in the silliest places and end up watching you in the mirror more than the dangers ahead. In particular, be careful if the rider in front is in turn trying to pass another bike or vehicle.

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good points TC , Para, Phil -- take them on board Korben-- I like being last --called 'Shepherd' not that I am any good in front cos never know where we going :lol: :lol: :lol:


make yourself space and make sure everyone knows what destination is -- hopefully a pub :lol: :lol:

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we as a collective want you

 

Houdini are you a Borg :lol:

Met A few at Matlock and had my first rideout last year Para was leading all i can say it was an excellent ride through so of wales finest :lol:

met loads of new folks yes it is nice to put a name to a face :wink:

hoping to get over to the east side this year :D

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Without clicking and meeting i would not know a whole heap of new freinds and deff would never have been to that frozen land of wales for a club race meet or know the delights of riding round the matlock area and plenty of other places



Will say know if ya are nervous about ya first ride out pm me and we can meet before in smaller group before ya progress onto full site meet


Please note i live in northants but then i am quite sure there are others who would willingly meet up new peeps all over the country

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I dont like riding in a group..... usually just me, stu n fozzy.


For the forum we split into groups, and were possible provide a map, just in case u do get lost.


As Roy says, its better if there are a couple of people that you do get used to riding with,, then join the bigger group.


If you really dont wanna ride as a group, im sure someone will volunteer to ride with you at the back, at your own pace until your confidence grows.


Never leave yourself out of these things.... everyone is there to help and make you feel welcome :)

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Your all too nice!! I was not led to believe this about bikers, and did not sign up for this!! :lol: :lol:


Thanks everyone, once the weather gets better I will be joining up, and I hope a load of others do as well.


I know Fatlad wants to soon.

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To be fair at most big meets theres generally someone on a 125 as well!


But as stated quite a few of us are out regularly and will endevour to meet up with newbies so you dont need to be mobbed at a big meet and feel overwhelmed.

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Group riding can be a bit daunting if you haven't done it before, but there is always someone who will ride with you. Rule of thumb is always ride to your own ability level and don't push yourself outside of wot you're truly comfortable with.


I'm an experienced group rider but prefer to take in the scenery and enjoy the journey. I don't put pressure on myself if I'm slightly slower than the other guys because I know I'll probably end up in a field somewhere! :lol:


On large group rides, it's advisable to go in 'packets' which is small groups of 5 or 6 riders as long rides can be quite difficult for 'tailend charlie' with 10 riders or more (but not impossible!)


When there's a large group of us at a meet, quite a few people ask how do i know which group to go in if the group splits. You need to be really honest with yourself here...no-one will think any the less of you which ever group you choose, but you do need to make an honest assessment of your own riding abilities. Better to be slightly under confident that over. You could always pick a group and if you felt at the end of the meet that next time you want to try another group then so beit. There are loads of meets throughout the season, so there'll be plenty of opportunities to ride with different groups and riders with varying skill levels.


The main thing we have in common is we all just wanna get out and have a good time, but we want to do it safely. I haven't met a rider on the forum yet who made me feel uncomfortable or pressured me into being quicker!


So come and give it a try.


X Will X

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At some meets the only decision you'll need to make is wether you go in the group with the women and talk light speed crap or join the men for all the top notch discussions and informative manly banter :lol:













Generally about the bloody women!

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have to say I was impressed by the level of riding on the pudding run, it was safe and everyone rode within their ability. Not IAM, but very good and sensible of the mix of riders and bikes we had and everyone looked out for each other

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I agree with all of the above.


As for rideouts newbies please dont worry about the pace of the ride there are pleanty of people of different abilities and machine types and sizes so you wont get left behind as someone always waits at a junction for ya.


The last matlock rideout we had there was everything from loaded up Bandits (yorbandit just had to go shopping) to big KTMs and full on sports bikes to 125s and we all had a great ride.


Again if you are worried about it there are usually a few of us who are willing to look after the 125s or nervous riders, or as yorbandit has mentioned put a post up in the local areas for a small rideout.


Most of all get stuck in and you will find that you will enjoy it once you are there.

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I`ve only ben on one reasonably big ride and I must admit I waited at a junction for others to pass, and I stopped too long and lost everyone. Total tw*t, but it was good fun when I eventually found them all. Roll on summer I`ll be joining Roy on the runs out to Matlock.

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