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Kawasaki Z500 B2 1980 refurb after 78260 miles


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Afternoon all,


Having read quite a few project reports on this forum I would like to add my own.

Will be posting the refurb on VJMC Kawasaki technical forum too.


Now that's out of the way here is a potted history of the bike.


Kawasaki Z500 B2 (Firecracker Red) bought new from Bob Fortune M/C Darlington for £1256.00


Out of the crate and rode home on trade plates by me.


First registered August 1st 1980 JAJ601W


Used For general transport and occasional blasts around Croft circuit till my Terry Beckett tuned RD400C took over.


On holiday Aug 1981 hit by White Escort in London. Damaged but rideable. Fixed on return.


Nov 1982-April 1983 Had now covered 44000 miles, winter strip. Frame paint, bolts Cadmium plated. New Wheel bearings, new rings and valve stem seals, new clutch plates. Second hand GPZ550H Unitrack STD pipes replaced the now well rotten STD pipes. New Rickman front crashbars. Looked brand new again.


July 1983 Hit by Honda Prelude, Major Damage. Wrote off, bought back. Forks and frame straightened, new yokes, new mudguard. New GPZ550H Unitrack STD exhausts. Second set of Rickman front crashbars. Worth their weight these things.


Things settled down a bit after this only new chain, sprocket etc and a Motad exhaust changed till now at 78260 miles. This bike has been with me man and boy, done everything asked of it and only let me down once when it kept blowing fuses thanks to me washing it far too often and putting it away with water in the switchgear.


I would have loved to show this bike at various events but even now my semi retired part time employment gets in the way at weekends. So I have started the refurb, not a restore as I will keep as much of the original bike as i can and still intend to ride it as much as possible. My plan is to get to 100,000 miles before the bike or I expire. Holidays will be booked in for next years events.


Enclosed to start this thread are the only shots I have when I got it home from the dealer before stripping it down to regrease shafts etc, I learned a lot with my SS50, CD175 and 400/4's about Japanese builds.


For comparison pics from when it turned 77777 miles in OCT 2015.


Will get some before and after shots and text as the jobs get done. Hope you all enjoy this journey as much as I will.This thread may become a bit picture heavy so will post smallish pics.


As new

1682755424_z500newb-w3.thumb.jpg.60396ed3389a133ff86fda24e2a20045.jpg

 

9 miles only

1904278853_z500newb-w.thumb.jpg.45b1e621a8be5cdaa13becad74e2add1.jpg

 

as it passed this milestone (77,777miles)

419235745_KawasakiZ500at77777miles.thumb.jpg.5e35b1a2394ca0c8a0237cb77cb5319e.jpg

 

full bike

1819206727_KawasakiZ500at77777miles2.thumb.jpg.5b63b82d8069417222363345508ec5a3.jpg

 

Have got the switch gear off so starting small and working my way through

LH

1915041386_LHSwitchbefore.JPG.353f74cf776e585da07403c3db97dddb.JPG

RH

100_2830.thumb.JPG.4ae1319a8b3ab262fbb858bd509df81f.JPG

 

So here goes, this may be a long job and pic heavy.


Regards


Rob B

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I know that digital cameras can be quite kind to bikes but that looks stunning just as it is . Coincidentaly my ER5 is approaching 77000 miles and the only issue is a very slack primary chain . So as soon as I've had a cup of tea I'm going to begin my engine swap by dropping out the old engine today . See my thread in this section . Good luck with the refurb.

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I know that digital cameras can be quite kind to bikes but that looks stunning just as it is . Coincidentaly my ER5 is approaching 77000 miles and the only issue is a very slack primary chain . So as soon as I've had a cup of tea I'm going to begin my engine swap by dropping out the old engine today . See my thread in this section . Good luck with the refurb.

 

Cheers will have a look later this afternoon after finished the "domestic" bit.


rob

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I see you have those Kawasaki forks with the slugs and circlips . I know a trick with those , let me know if you get stuck .

 

Would like to know your method, i have had these fork tops off quite a few times now, mainly to change the oil.


My method is to soak in wd40 overnight then screw a 12mm fine pitch bolt into the slug, slip a flat bladed screwdriver in and pop the circip out. Mole grips on the 12mm bolt if needed to wiggle the slug out, do this when forks still in yoke and same when assembly. Red rubber grease on the seal and pack before putting the plastic cap back on keeps the worst of the weather out. My fork seals are the originals also the springs, still in spec. When it was new a 20mm spacer was used to preload the front a bit more and 5W oil was perfect for the damping. On the road had fork gaiters most of the time.


Have done a few where you have to take fork leg out and use the fork spring to punch the slug out. Cloth over hole obviously.


Rob

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I see you have those Kawasaki forks with the slugs and circlips . I know a trick with those , let me know if you get stuck .

 

Would like to know your method, i have had these fork tops off quite a few times now, mainly to change the oil.


My method is to soak in wd40 overnight then screw a 12mm fine pitch bolt into the slug, slip a flat bladed screwdriver in and pop the circip out. Mole grips on the 12mm bolt if needed to wiggle the slug out, do this when forks still in yoke and same when assembly. Red rubber grease on the seal and pack before putting the plastic cap back on keeps the worst of the weather out. My fork seals are the originals also the springs, still in spec. When it was new a 20mm spacer was used to preload the front a bit more and 5W oil was perfect for the damping. On the road had fork gaiters most of the time.


Have done a few where you have to take fork leg out and use the fork spring to punch the slug out. Cloth over hole obviously.


Rob

 

Ok , I don't have any threaded holes in mine . Anyway , all I do is keep the handle bars on to use as a fulcrum and get the biggest Allen key in my toolbox with the short end on the slug . Pull up on the long end to push against the spring and pop the circlip out with your free hand . Then the plugs should slide out easily. Sounds like yours at a bit reluctant.

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Some do, some just have a countersink in the top so your screwdriver/Allen key can slip out of it at the most inopportune moment. my B1 has these little blighters the B2 does not.


Took the LH and RH switchgear to bits and did a clean up, sorted the scratch as best as I could on the RH switch then did a couple of light coats of Techcote Satin Black on them. Will ask SO in the morning if she could use her extensive art skills to repaint the stamped in lettering on the switches before a couple of coats of satin lacquer.


Am pleasantly surprised at the state of the switch internals, all work well and positive so just a de-grease and silicon grease injection on assembly.


LH lower internals, horn, pass.

2027277190_LHSwitchbeforebottom.thumb.JPG.5601bff1ef738c0a8903ac907efc148b.JPG

lower internals, horn, pass.

1935388934_LHSwitchbeforetop.thumb.JPG.60a17424bf9932bae0bb1f9fa0a86377.JPG

upper internals h/l dimmer

1940373121_LHSwitchwiringbefore.thumb.JPG.4feabb1e83dc68207ac9f8e91b4574c8.JPG

all wiring removed

 

RH Lights, start, Engine Run-stop

1780471890_RHupper.thumb.jPG.31c54be40ed837d82a7df079ecaaaeaa.jPG

RH upper

846109168_RHlower.thumb.jPG.f07749dfabbd01af5a016d614720e51e.jPG

RH lower

1478238903_RHupperandlower.thumb.jPG.54805aec1bd49a640f9b25d58eecd29b.jPG

RH upper and lower internals

 

Rob B

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Had a good week so far, LH wiring in very good order and looks good as new after a clean and de-grease.

822772905_1-LHSwitchwiringcleaned.thumb.JPG.5bb07ec697ff11f1fdb2c346bc01f0ba.JPG

 

Covers painted Techcote Satin Black, lettering done by my partner Julie then a few coats of Satin Lacquer. Found a great match in the art paint she uses were Gamboge for the yellow and Titanium for the white.

 

1496722949_4-LHSwitchcleanedpaintedreadytoassemble.JPG.54e21cbb832d9cae7dfb16fd77e597dd.JPG

 

lower switch goes together easy but the top half has to be assembled in the right order -

Dimmer contact strip first with screw no 1, then wire clamp with screw no 2, finally the moving contact spring loaded popped in (3 ).

1178144161_5-LHSwitchwiringthehldimmerorder.thumb.jPG.d7a13d98b05cfe2f06d3837f4c1f55fb.jPG

all tested and back together

1217645579_6-LHSwitchcomplete.JPG.2e941ad3e2ae2015e155f3c6d14dd22f.JPG

 

RH switchgear took a bit more cleaning thanks to the regular greasing the throttle grip got and oil down the cables. Also there is a battle scar near the lights on/off switch which i have mostly polished out, so


upper and lower painted Techcote satin black

1573278678_02RHupperpaintsatinblack.JPG.ddb03a0d442bde411c252abc26510395.JPG

1609750404_01RHlowerpaintonly.JPG.72cc0c7317f98ddd9e8274ed04f56027.JPG

 

Julie did the lettering again

805076142_03RHupperpaintsatinblack-withlettering.thumb.JPG.ae4e7ed438ca8ba539b23b43160e1ea8.JPG

 

Finally a couple of coats of satin lacquer and ready to assemble. This side goes together really easy

1724453389_04RHupperpaintsatinblack-withlettering-satinlacquer.thumb.JPG.64b878c3cd4afc95e0d05222977015ca.JPG

 

Finished RH switch

 

345897701_05RHfinished.thumb.JPG.14afae9ff53c3393c3ab18ab77cd090d.JPG

 

To finish for today a before and after

765230569_beforeandafter.thumb.jpg.b0e5addae986bd50e5df87a8de33568a.jpg

 

More after the weekend


Rob B

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Cheers chaps for your kind words and encouragement.


I have lurked here and other forums glued to many a restoration and build thread. The quality of work i have seen from you people is truly amazing and inspirational.

This is the first time i have been able to take my time with a full strip and rebuild. Previously I have had work, family and sometimes profit to hurry me up. Done lots of work on my own bikes in the past from the humble SS50 /C100 / C50's through 400/4's, RD's a mighty Z1R (small tank) and even my RE5. Painted stuff like these with aerosol cans, frames, brackets and sometimes bodywork sent stuff of for plating (Cadmium when you could) still do not have compressor or machine tools. Having now more time and a Bandit for sunny days, a GS125 for pottering around in all weathers, I can give my owned from new and well loved Z500 the attention it needs to go from a good condition survivor to a showable ridden classic of it's time. It feel good to have this bike to refurb knowing it's full history as finding a project as complete as this would be hard and cost more than I have to fund it. The Bandit had a good 53000 mile half strip nearly 2 years ago and will hope to post that story here when i get time, and yes i did take a load of before and after shots.


As i have said before this is good tidy up and not a restore so will see what can be done using everything from the original bike that's serviceable.


Finally here is a pic from July 1981 all shined before my annual hols (where it was hit by a white escort in London, it had done just shy of 15000 miles then.

1349552266_JAJ601WSummer1981-blackwheels-small.thumb.jpg.4e99e0305a8109dfd890f9f21eebd3fa.jpg

 

Rob B

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Just a quick one so to speak.


Gave the ignition switch a clean and repaint.

Before:

1061585691_IgSwitchbefore.thumb.JPG.dbceb1428f54018e3cbdb6afce0911b1.JPG

 

Out with smaller JIS screwdrivers, clean and strip

1181393731_IgSwitchallbefore.thumb.JPG.cf402fc222f191b5442029db6301891e.JPG

 

The contact assembly was fun to do and glad i remembered my dad's advice, "if you strip anything unknown and may have springs and small bits in always take it apart in a box"


sure enough BOING when the assembly was removed the small springs made a good bid to escape but were caught in the box Phew!!

Cleaned switch body masked and a light and then medium coat of satin black, next day 2 wet coats of satin lacquer.


switch assembly carefully assembled and greased, connections cleaned greased and tested in all modes, even the stearing lock works smoother now.


Rebuilt

100_2838.thumb.JPG.ccd3a6b82ad52a08594497fbca0209e9.JPG

100_2841.thumb.JPG.977c40498ad8eeb9ef59105d915bca29.JPG

 

Possibly clocks (gauges for our cousins over the pond) next.


Rob B

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  • 5 months later...

Sorry for the delay in posting, got a new job :thumb:


Done quite a lot since Christmas break.


January 2019 update on the Z500 refurb.


It was June 2018 when I fished out the Spare wheels for Z500 number 2 from the back of the shed and hoped to get them fully done to speed up the refurb of Z500 number one. I did wash the wheels and de crud the disc and sprocket carrier but that was as far as I got.


Rear wheel before

1889405224_Rearwheekbrakeside.thumb.JPG.32bda94b3deed6b9dce5efca51661e2e.JPG

 

Wheels, rear disc, carrier and spindle from spare back wheel before.


Rear disc and bolts before

1220653007_Reardiscandboltsbefore.thumb.JPG.b3294593680bbc8b6bc6ead432396929.JPG

 

Rear Spindle and chain adjusters before

316456399_RearSpindleandchainadjustersbefore.thumb.JPG.9750e4148895386c46a083707aa32c45.JPG

 

These spare wheels have not done many road miles and are in fairly good condition. When Z500 number one had it's 44000 mile strip and clean over winter 82 - 83 all the bolts were cadmium plated, but Z500 number two was complete but under large amounts of polythene outside so missed out.


First off was the rear disc, did not look too bad so got as much of the hard paint or what ever Mr Kawasaki put on these off and spent a nice half hour masking the rotor off


2 light coats of primer later

2097217984_Reardiscmaskedandprimed-2.thumb.JPG.6257166175cba507a66462bcb5b1bbf0.JPG1202319887_Reardiscbackmaskedandprimed.thumb.JPG.50f6c2096103fc4842479324d5ebe760.JPG

 

U-Pol satin black with Halfords gloss lacquer

1422173737_Reardiscsatinblackwithglosslacquer.thumb.JPG.727098562dd5c207b995dece3496b5e8.JPG

Not too happy with the finish. It's a bit too glossy so will satin lacquer over the top when the weather warns up.


The hub carrier was quite chipped and while out checked the drive bearing, one rough patch so out it came followed by taking the sprocket off, you may be able to see from the pic that the right retaining washer had split, intend to plate these like I did on the GS 125 but will order some replica ones to finish it off. Learned from the disc hub to just use satin paint on this.


fitted it up temp for this pic

1623351523_Sprockethubpainted.JPG.9fb7b05a50bb1061bbcf4d4a32295783.JPG

 

see next post for plating the spindle etc

1296992428_rearhubbefore.thumb.JPG.66315927ae641430a05cfd8dbd4d052d.JPG

268808712_Rearwheeksprocketside.thumb.JPG.7ac5bba1d5e75e6d2bc28494fadfd757.JPG

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I have to agree , gloss black just doesn't do the trick . No matter how well it's applied it just seems to draw attention to any imperfections . Satin black , on the other hand, makes everything look just right. Nice work so far . 👍

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I would love to get the stuff that they put on in the factory. The Techcote stuff and U-Pol are quite near. May try some Simoniz tough black in satin when my supplies run out.


Have a lot to post re this build and it is coming together nicely.


Cheers

Rob

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I would love to get the stuff that they put on in the factory. The Techcote stuff and U-Pol are quite near. May try some Simoniz tough black in satin when my supplies run out.


Have a lot to post re this build and it is coming together nicely.


Cheers

Rob

 

I've used PJ1 Satin Black in the past . It's very good stuff but to honest it was made even more attractive by the fact that I got a generous staff discount . 😆 https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F132540197789 sorry that's the wrong one but at least it's still available .

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January 2019 update cont'd

Plated the spindle, bolts etc from the back wheel.

a quick reminder how they looked

2079370813_RearSpindleandchainadjustersbefore.thumb.JPG.310ac0e79c567cba5a44d2ac108b7431.JPG

426083402_Reardiscandboltsbefore.thumb.JPG.3893d2f86dde8724971e97257f97e935.JPG

Buffed the old plating and corrosion of the parts and over the course of 2 days. Plated all the hardware and fasteners. My current plating tank is only 3 litres and OK for most stuff but the spindle will not fit in it's entirety. To make things easy for myself I will only replate the ends, the middle part has only slight corrosion and is after all coated in grease so this should be no problem.


So how to support the spindle to plate only the ends? I came up with this, which even though is the MK 1 version it worked.

1934744519_SpindleholderMK1.thumb.JPG.c6b33ee0496d359538126553a5f45c16.JPG

 

I used a G-Clamp on a convenient shelf with the spindle hung with stiff wire round the nut head to do the threaded part, and to do the other end as you can see via the split pin hole. I could have just screwed on the nut and hung both ends the same way but was plating the nut as well.


Spindle all finished. Noted that I must have used a none standard bolt for one side of the chain adjusters, the std one has a point at the end of the 8 mm x 50 mm set bolt to fit into the adjuster stopper (these are common to a lot of Kawasak's from KH250 possibly earlier up to Z750). Also as an interesting point ( Anorak Alert ) the across the flats size on these rear chain bolts / nuts and on the small 8 mm x 35 mm chain adjuster stopper upset- bolts (no idea why.....I've treat them well over the years!) are 13 mm not the usual J.I.S. 12 mm. So can replace the other side with a Stainless bolt and half nut and grind a point on the bolt end.


Spindle Done

874938049_rearspindledone.thumb.JPG.51b9a9a658952b9d990bd3a37d47b9db.JPG

Temp fitted together

1874826128_discsidedone.JPG.b47006a88781268f80bf4225f85e60bc.JPG

 

Plated the sprocket bolts and nuts too. Will post a completed shot when I've fitted the bearing. Oddly enough (Another Anorak Alert) the Z500 having a disc brake at the rear has a completely different sprocket carrier to the Z550 models even the 1981 GPZ550D1 with rear disc is different, this is the same unit fitted to Z500 B3, I do not think the UK got these. The Z500 B1-B2 uses 4 bolts to secure the sprocket and a 6205 hub bearing while the 550's use a 6 bolt arrangement and a 6305 hub bearing very similar to the Z650 drum and disc braked models. IIRC the later 650's had a 6206 hub bearing. Z400J, Z500, and 550's use the same rear wheel bearings 6303.



Rob B

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  • 4 weeks later...

March 2019 update


Wiring loom


The most damaged part the loom is the multiplug socket (frame side) from the alternator to the regulator rectifier. My own fault really, I noticed about 25 years ago that there must be a bit of a high resistance joint on one of the 2 yellow wires, the 2 from the alternator, in this 4 wire multiplug. I just cleaned it up and applied some more di-electric grease. The bike has always maintained a good charge so I must now have a good connection. No!

333358277_05-RRSocketdamage-3.thumb.JPG.f6b6b7ef2ade6d92c3ed986859e112aa.JPG

 

and this is the plug (RR side)

680908303_01-RRplugdamage.thumb.JPG.5dd83613ac6679b1c52688a6f4fcec52.JPG

 

Some of these oem style connectors are available from the net including Zed-Parts.com

https://www.zed-parts.com/product-page/4-x-6-3-pole-spade-male-female-block-large

Would do the job and if was really lucky be able to mod the plastic bits to accept a std RR or for a std RR to plug into my loom.

But no, I would like to repair my old connectors just to see if it was possible. I already have some 6.3 mm male and female brass connectors. After photographing and making wiring diagrams for the plug and socket spent a whole hour removing the old burnt and corroded connectors from the plug and socket and scrubbing them as clean as possible.


The state of the old connectors

1692266144_09-Oldconnectorsafterremoval.thumb.JPG.53999c7fd3a9d91e12b41f7e5797c2c7.JPG

There was a small length of the worst yellow wire were the insulation was hard so cut down as far as good wire and trimmed the other 3 to the same length, ended up losing 20 mm of wire, no problem.

Crimped, soldered then heat shrinked the wires to the new connectors.

1541266525_01-Socketconnectorscrimp-solderd.thumb.JPG.ed99e6fc980398ead04accae35dac66d.JPG

842887042_04-Plugconnectorscrimp-solderinprogress.thumb.JPG.e5c8e898dd95523cba0e61be6edb48b1.JPG

Installed into the cleaned up plug and socket.

1497032802_06-Plugconnectorsin-2.thumb.JPG.2d185b04dc4d8790b0ec9b5712b89ed0.JPG

1177231925_08-Newconnectorsinnotrepaired-2.thumb.JPG.7a9cbe2152e6da8f8e4f3a20704aaaa5.JPG

 

Had a thought how to fix that gaping hole. Thanks to a post on TheMotorbikeForum from a user called malt_vinegar who was using this stuff called Whitemorph to repair fairing tabs on his CBR125.

https://www.themotorbikeforum.co.uk/vie ... 87&t=69265

It is a themoplastic, heat in water above 60C and the granuals melt, then form the now clear stuff into shape or in my case into the socket and let it cool and set. I ordered 100g of the stuff from manufacturers ebay page for £3.99 and had a go.


Not much time to work on the melted stuff (use kitchen gloves it hot) about 20 seconds out the the hot water and it's pretty much set. You can add more as it does stick to its self as well as the socket, make a mess and just place in hot water and try again. I filled most of the gap and insulated between the bottom 2 connectors and even added some to the top wire ends as extra waterproofing.


Done before trimming

1181302365_11-Connectorsdonebutnottrimmed-2.thumb.JPG.0cdcafe105a49a9e194e53fba697fbbe.JPG

 

after

259687252_13-Connectorsfinnished-2.thumb.JPG.0317df584f7731d40da40ec19301c01e.JPG

1801893433_15-Connectorsfinnished-5.thumb.JPG.5c1a48d9a03d64bcd9ca0377634b1d11.JPG

After a continuity and insulation resistance test ready to fit.


Rob B

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  • 1 month later...

April update


Rear Brakes.

The last time the rear caliper got fully stripped, sand blasted and painted was 1983. The bike had 43000 miles at the time and was having what I thought to be it's half life rebuild. This time I did not have the luxury of my works beadblaster so resorted to my trusty wire wheels, wet and dry and elbow grease.

 

296410032_1-Completeasremoved.thumb.jpg.1699e9845852b993623b29853ec0e8aa.jpg

657633224_2-Mastercylinder.thumb.JPG.3de8f9668804abb10afeb43930e9578d.JPG

That stuff on the master cylinder pipe is the remains of a latex glove if you want to know..


Caliper easily stripped and pistons blown out. Some corrosion but cleaned up.

Right side corrosion

1041378536_8-Rearrightcylindercorrosion.JPG.JPG.d61c7a6e7ed2243a096b97f94131f61e.JPG

Left side

1544676446_5-Rearleftcylindercorrosion.JPG.164fd07d588c45151f82395a621c851f.JPG

 

Right piston

227296234_9-Rearrightpistoncorrosion.thumb.JPG.4bce5ac90c2804293ac7426f3721a741.JPG

 

left piston

196707402_6-Rearleftpistoncorrosion.thumb.JPG.641d71f98aeafb0569c0c65cf073bf6a.JPG

 

The pistons and calipers cleaned up easy with 2000 wet and dry followed by Autosol.


The master cylinder clip, stop and piston assembly were removed and the lot just fitted in my 1.3 ltr ultrasonic cleaner where it stayed for 30mins at 50C. Inspection showed no damage to either rubbers or bore, good job as the replacement kit for this master cylinder is nearly £80. So a blow out and reassembly with red rubber grease then primed with new brake fluid and bunged.


Both caliper halves took the best part of the day with various wire wheels (steel and brass) to remove all the old paint, it was old school PJ1 done in 1983 and held up well.

Day 2, wet and dried the casting smooth and 30mins each side in the cleaner

Day 3, masked and a light coat of etch primer followed at 30 min intervals with 2 light coats of Techcote Satin Black.

Day 4, more 2000 wet and dry and 2 medium coats and 2 wet coats of Satin Black.


Had to wait a few days before I could cure them fully in the oven (guess why?) 190C for 40 mins from a cold oven and left in to cool slow. Lovely finnish and should last well without a satin clear coat.


There are many places to get seals with various prices and quality, I went for a full seal kit from Powerhouse Automotive (UK) Ltd's Ebay shop at £22.90, they do a kit with stainless steel pistons included for around £65.00 if my 78000 mile ones had not been in spec. Thankfully I cleaned my brakes regular and change fluid too.


Plated the 2 master cylinder mount bolts (M8 x 30mm flanged) and banjo bolts bright zinc, the caliper bolts (M10 x 45 socket head) olive drab together with the bleed nipple. The seal kit comes with a new nipple but this is yellow passivated and need an 8mm spanner where the factory one need a 10mm spanner and mine is in good condition.

Laid out the bits for a photoshoot before assembly

1649536803_1-allpartstoassemble.thumb.JPG.8e6d8afa55052fb31d9433518579b898.JPG

Fitted the new seals and dust covers

97850986_5-Newsealsfitted.thumb.JPG.656206393a144c88e5a958692d8d0898.JPG

Rear wheel back out and caliper fitted

987462579_6-Rearcaliperfitted.thumb.JPG.5bc451e0633b7dbc88e9fb0c7761f748.JPG

And master cylinder

1663517188_7-Rearmastercylinderfitted.thumb.JPG.d8d1d02562175f86ffe18f6e42365552.JPG

I may replate the banjo bolts olive drab when I get my braided hoses. I would love to refit my now 40 year old pipes (stamped 09/79) but even with no physical signs of damage I will not take chances with brakes. Any one recommend a good kit? Hel, Goodridge ....


Regards to all

Rob B

Rear view detail.JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...

With the riding season well underway have put the Z rolling frame to one side while the Bandit is in and out of the shed. A good opportunity to start the engine strip and inspection.


It has always been a pain to support any engine i have worked on out of a frame so....


Love the idea of a car engine stand modified to hold the bike motor or even two of these face to face so rotation would be easier. So as usual i set about making ssomething to steady the motor, the obvious answer was to make a framework around it. Not having any metal and welding kit I had a wander round the back of the potting shed where all the odd bits end up. Found the old gate post, 2 nice pieces of 1 1/2 X 3 treated timber.


After measuring the motor front and rear mounts set about cutting and test fitting the bits. Needed to shave a few bits to clear the sump, removeable gear selector cover and clutch cover.


Finally glued and screwed together with suitable holes cut for the std mount bolts to suspend the engine in the wood. Had to tun the engine on its back to fit the framework and push the bolts in then upright, perfect fit. Removed it and gave it a coat of paint.



All done. Now just need to to phone my mate Ian and lift it onto the now cleared bench.

Front-angle.thumb.JPG.66707a1eda24609594da97aa8429573b.JPGLH-angle.thumb.JPG.2e6cf795f65850285a8328e92d1f639d.JPGRear.thumb.JPG.02580801a8676bd256b03a0666ea6842.JPGRH.thumb.JPG.c2cb46513c36d33f3803065e56530c41.JPGLH.thumb.JPG.ac7a9609b85504ecc2cc2f26ad4d5644.JPG

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