Jump to content
  • Sign up now

    Registration is quick and easy 

Drive a car before riding a bike?


Recommended Posts

Riding a bike gives you more road awareness than being cosseted in the protection of a car. The best skill you can learn is anticipation of what others around you are going to do, and that only comes with practice. You can also gain a lot of knowledge by reading books like Roadcraft the Police Motorcylist's manual. But there is nothing better than getting out there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMHO Personally I would say in todays world the protection of a car to start with is a good thing.


Most people bend there first car in the first year, on a bike that can be broken bones.


Yes you are more aware and learn quicker on a bike. Then mistakes in bikes much more costly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never owned or driven a car on the road but I have managed to survive forty odd years of motorbike and bicycle riding . Some would argue that riding a motorbike first will give you a heightened awareness of the dangers on the road and therefore make you a better and more considerate car driver.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No joke, either is fine as long as you know the rules of the road. I did my cbt with a young Japanese chap - just arrived in the UK - he didn't know how to use a roundabout which was terrifying. On the cbt they expect you know things like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with [mention]geofferz[/mention]


A bit of the rules of the road is covered during the CBT, but to me if you're learning something during that bit of the day it's too soon for you.


The CBT is a very small talk on SOME of the rules of the road, a bit of learning on how to use the bike and then a couple of hours on the road. Then you're let loose with a certificate.


If you are a sensible soul who despite having never driven a car has taken the time to learn the Highway Code and also know you're embarking on a learning adventure once you've got your CBT then you may do OK. But if you're like some "L's Angels" who get a certificate then get themselves into all manner of grief then.... :shock:


Flick through the Highway Code, do some practice theory tests (not required for CBT, but it will test your knowledge and attitude) and maybe even watch some motorbike videos YouTube to start to see some of the common hazards you may face and how you would deal with them (hint, not 'rev bombing rather than taking avoiding action')


Don't necessarily ride like "everyone is out to kill you" - because actually most people aren't - but ride thinking "has that person seen me?" as you go down the road.


Good luck :thumb:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Riding a bike gives you more road awareness than being cosseted in the protection of a car. The best skill you can learn is anticipation of what others around you are going to do, and that only comes with practice. You can also gain a lot of knowledge by reading books like Roadcraft the Police Motorcylist's manual. But there is nothing better than getting out there.

 

Totally agree with this, I Rode a bike for years on the road before getting my car licence, I personally think it makes you a better driver, I think all car drivers shout have to do CBT before being given a licence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends how accident prone you are and how confident you are.

A nervous accident prone person is probably safer starting off in a car.

 

Such a person should never have any sort of driving/riding licence. They are a menace to themselves and everybody else on the road. We already too many of these on the roads as it is, which is why I think the driving test should be considerably harder and force people to go through the same hoops to get a car licence that motorcyclists do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is much less about the road rules and more about getting used to other peoples crappy driving etc haha

Well thanks for that insight.....I think the name gives it away. ...."newbiker". "Crappy driving" generally derives from a failure to follow the rules of the road, not from anything else. Bike first every time. Once you gave a firmer grasp of the consequences of getting it wrong (caused, strangely enough, by the harsher consequences of getting it wrong on a bike), you tend to be a hit more careful across the board. I find that not too many bikers are blasé about slippery roads and bad weather. ....unlike car drivers who have never had to cope with two wheels.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never driven a car in my life... Back in the early 80s I made a deal with myself, I would happily take driving lessons and drive a car (or whatever) but only if someone else, an employer, paid for it. That almost happened in 1989, but, luckily I was headhunted and changed jobs. So, 38 years on a bike, 36 with a full license. And zero regrets. And no desire whatsoever to join the teeming masses in their queues. Doing what they do, picking their noses and examining it like its a priceless object. Desperately trying to make a phonecall. Or texting. Occasionally spouting billowing clouds of vape smoke and then opening the window in a panic... For obvious reasons. Or making me go all misty eyed and nostalgic over a misspent youth with a miasma of weed smoke following. Queuing at petrol stations for their petrol cap side pump. While I go merrily by to one of the vacant slots. Driving exceptionally badly on a Saturday, because they commute on auto pilot, half asleep and real driving is hard work.. So let's not bother concentrating.


I could go on... That was just yesterday. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.