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Training in the wet


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Hey all,


I thought I would start a thread for people to share their experiences of training / riding best practices in the wet! (Sorry if it’s been covered, I couldn’t see anything though)


Be booking my DAS soon. Likely to be done in april so I am anticipating the rain to fall at some point. I just wanted to see if anyone has any pointers (I know instructors will no doubt give advice on the day and so on) such as cornering techniques and especially some of the MOD1 tests such as avoidance and emergency stop, having looked on YouTube it doesn’t fill me with confidence, the first video I watched someone came right off and slid down the road trying to do emergency stop :|


Is there any leeway given by examiners in the rain compared to if it was a dry day when doing MOD1?


So yeah, any pointers which might help me / anyone else that will be doing training soon would be much appreciated :D

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The "emergency" stop for MOD1 does not have to be very aggressive at all so just take it easy and keep it under control. The examiner would expect a longer stopping distance in the wet so don't overcook it.


For MOD2 if it's wet pay attention to the road surface and look out for slippery stuff like dropped oil, drain covers, and road paint. If you keep your speed in check, accelerate, brake, and corner smoothly then you'll not get into any bother. Remember your braking distance is double so 4 seconds from the car in front.

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Through CBT, training and test days I had one day where it didn't rain at some point. On that day I failed my mod 1 so I think the rain was good for me :lol:


In the wet, just do everything a bit more reserved. So squeeze the brakes a bit more progressively, be smooth as you roll on and off the throttle, don't lean the bike so much (but don't be afraid NOT to lean it). Try to avoid (or ride straight over) painted lines and drains. If wet ride where car tyres go as the oil would have been dropped in the centre of the lane, but you'll also spot this middle patch dries first as the conditions improve so then don't be afraid to ride on that. Yes, your instructor will help.


Will you get a bit of leeway in mod 1 because it's wet? Yes, but the surface is pretty grippy anyway. On the avoidance you won't lose the bike even if it's wet, it'll cope.


The vid you saw out of interest, was that on Roadcraft Nottingham's channel? If so that's because the guy went from 0 to 100% brakes straightaway with a panic grab. Instead you need to squeeze the lever on, then progressively keep braking to a stop whilst keeping your eyes up on the horizon. He has another video where he talks through this and explains why it's important.

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The MOD1 test centre surface is very grippy, much better than any road but as such they still expect an effort on emergency stop (think someone on here was failed for being over cautious on emergency stop in the wet) but in general their expectations of emergency stop are more reaction and keeping control than stopping on a sixpence.


In general so not underestimate the need of wet weather clothing, getting caught out in the rain when walking is an inconvenience, on a bike it hurts! I got caught out once and never again, heavy rain at 40mph felt like hail stones :lol:

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Thanks for the advice so far, really useful. I think I’ve got it in my head that as soon as the roads are wet riding a bike is going to be like riding on ice haha!

 


The vid you saw out of interest, was that on Roadcraft Nottingham's channel? If so that's because the guy went from 0 to 100% brakes straightaway with a panic grab. Instead you need to squeeze the lever on, then progressively keep braking to a stop whilst keeping your eyes up on the horizon. He has another video where he talks through this and explains why it's important.

 

I believe it was yeah, the guy full on braked and just stacked it in a split second of putting the brakes on, I’ll be sure to be progressive should it rain though!

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As said just as in the dry but do everything more progressively, and what out for oil and diesel at roundabouts mainly, normally you can smell it before you see it but if you see a bloomed bluey patch on the road try and avoid it, you probably won't go down if you ride through it but best practice is to avoid it if possible, also with the more modern tyres like Michelin road pilot 4 and 5 you can near enough ride the same in the wet as in the dry, my road pilot 4s have done over 12 thousand miles and 1 trackday at a snetterton open pit lane day and they are only about 2/3 worn

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My MOD2 was in such heavy rain that my (very experienced) instructor was bracing me for the test being cancelled at the last minute.


I just tried to still show my intention to 'make progress' when there was opportunity, but took it easy where I could, too.


It was hard in parts - the examiner gave me a minor for the sweeping bend that I turned into a couple of slower ones when I lost confidence in the grip I might find, and another minor for getting a bit close to the car in front, given the conditions.


With wet gear - take your gloves off by pulling each finger individually so the linings don't turn inside out, and DO NOT breath-in anywhere near your waterproof trousers once you've taken them off after several hours nervous and soaked hours riding. :puke: :puke:

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Don't overthink it, ride as you normally would on a lesson. You aren't going to be doing anything that tests the limits of the bikes wet-grip. No examiners won't treat you any differently due to rain. If you wanna avoid what happened in the video, try to use a school with bikes that have ABS. That doesn't mean you shouldn't learn the correct way to emergency stop, but you're less likely to fall off if you get it wrong.

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Check out RJH motorbike training on YouTube, got some great videos that I felt really helped me.


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiHVOZpzEyMTiCU0JNU9f0A

 

"New road, check me mirrors cancel me signal" worked wonders for me when I needed to concrete in a process to ensure I cancelled my signals after every junction :thumb:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wet is a bitch but in honesty Id rather ride in the rain than a dry day with high wind!


Tyres are pretty decent these days and most riding schools only use bikes with ABS for MOD 1 to stop any avoidable/dangerous emergency stops. Also the test centre compounds are usually the best tarmac you'll find to ride on haha (qrippy and constantly treated).


The only advice I have is that theres a lot of space between the examiner signalling you to brake and how far you have to brake. Dont panic and rush it.


Front brake, back brake, clutch in and finally left foot down.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Did my CBT in Feb and it was wet snow, it had to be called off and I'm glad because I was almost hypothermic haha then when i was doing my DAS, the next year in March, it again snowed and it was heavier and wetter. Proper grim.

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Check out RJH motorbike training on YouTube, got some great videos that I felt really helped me.


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiHVOZpzEyMTiCU0JNU9f0A

 

"New road, check me mirrors cancel me signal" worked wonders for me when I needed to concrete in a process to ensure I cancelled my signals after every junction :thumb:

 

I did my cbt and das with these guys, they were great and id recomened these guys to everybody

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  • 2 weeks later...

Absolutely pissed it down during my Mod 1 training and test. Same for Mod 2 (November last year). I was hesitant and worried I was being impatient, thinking “should I defer to summer?” But I was also worried that the missus would come to her senses and withdraw the approval for me to get a licence and bike, so I stuck it through.


I might be wrong, but I think learning in the torrential rain helped me be more risk aware and cautious. This can only help on the test, as long as you’re not too cautious (not making any progress) and I expect it has made me more risk aware as a rider.


That said, still early days in my riding career but I am very glad to be looking forward to the nice spring and summer riding weather and hopefully getting some enjoyable miles under my belt as opposed to using the summer to train and take tests.

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