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Bikers - sometimes our own worst enemies.


S-Westerly
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Today while in the car I was on the M27 in the road works area with the mandatory 50 mph. I was trundling along at about 55 mph and in cruise control. All three lanes were doing more or less the same. I heard him before I saw him and realised that somewhere near there was a bike. A hero on a sports bike came haring past splitting lanes and weaving left and right probably at 80 or so. My point is that as a biker I realised he was around but how many other drivers would have especially if they had music playing etc? They certainly wouldn't be expecting him to be at that speed and if someone changed lanes and he ends up being in collision I'd say he'd be entirely to blame. Also a good candidate for the Darwin Awards.

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Yep , makes you cringe doesn't it . I saw , or rather heard one this very evening right where I live on an all green Kwak probably a 600 . Just from the sound I know this tosser had gone from 0 to 80 plus in a few hundred yards of totally unsuitable road with the potential for cars or pedestrians to step out before anyone could blink . I was just waiting to hear the screech and the bang but mercifully it never came . But one day it will and it won't be pleasant .

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Unfortunately that type of riders or drivers newer mind will cause more strict rules and repression again all of us.

Not to mention bad reputation for all motorcyclists. I love to twist the throttle but there is time and place for it.

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Same as others have said, time and place for that and it just gives us a bad name :roll:


I also feel bad when you can tell their in a group, and the riders behind are desperately trying to keep up.

I've been that second rider before and it's horrible, trying to dodge traffic because the person in front knows where there going and is meant to be leading you.

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Agree that the rider sounds like a douche, but they do not represent me and I refuse to accept any form of collective responsibility, or that it gives "us" a bad name.


Whenever you hear someone say "the problem with you bikers..." call them out on it. I am not responsible for the actions of anyone else. It's a slippery slope and it is not our duty to police the actions of other riders (eg when people say "the biker community should....").


I see car drivers using their mobiles and speeding every day but I don't tarnish all drivers with the same brush, nor see some youngsters thrashing their modified cars around Tesco car park at 11pm at night with music blaring and say that other drivers should do something about it.

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Agree that the rider sounds like a douche, but they do not represent me and I refuse to accept any form of collective responsibility, or that it gives "us" a bad name.


Whenever you hear someone say "the problem with you bikers..." call them out on it. I am not responsible for the actions of anyone else. It's a slippery slope and it is not our duty to police the actions of other riders (eg when people say "the biker community should....").


I see car drivers using their mobiles and speeding every day but I don't tarnish all drivers with the same brush, nor see some youngsters thrashing their modified cars around Tesco car park at 11pm at night with music blaring and say that other drivers should do something about it.

 

I really agree with this, the idea that there is some kind of instant kinship between people based on what mode of transport you use is nuts, like you say the whole ‘biker community’ thing is weird.

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Sans, I agree completely and I do normally call it out, in a polite friendly manner and offer to show them round my bike and all the gear I wear.


It is natural for people to build a prejudice in their head, especially when they have very little contact with the party that they see the bad habits of (i.e. me looking at BMW drivers and assuming their going to cut me up without indicating!).

Just needs more conversation around it all.


This is starting to sound like a ride out to prove how polite bikers can be on the roads :lol: Lots of stopping at zebra crossings, giving way to people trying to pass, helping old ladies cross the road :mrgreen:

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Sans, I agree completely and I do normally call it out, in a polite friendly manner and offer to show them round my bike and all the gear I wear.


It is natural for people to build a prejudice in their head, especially when they have very little contact with the party that they see the bad habits of (i.e. me looking at BMW drivers and assuming their going to cut me up without indicating!).

Just needs more conversation around it all.


This is starting to sound like a ride out to prove how polite bikers can be on the roads :lol: Lots of stopping at zebra crossings, giving way to people trying to pass, helping old ladies cross the road :mrgreen:

 

Well come on then let's set it up........

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Agree that the rider sounds like a douche, but they do not represent me and I refuse to accept any form of collective responsibility, or that it gives "us" a bad name.


Whenever you hear someone say "the problem with you bikers..." call them out on it. I am not responsible for the actions of anyone else. It's a slippery slope and it is not our duty to police the actions of other riders (eg when people say "the biker community should....").


I see car drivers using their mobiles and speeding every day but I don't tarnish all drivers with the same brush, nor see some youngsters thrashing their modified cars around Tesco car park at 11pm at night with music blaring and say that other drivers should do something about it.

 

I think you've missed my point probably because of the way I wrote it. What I was trying to get across is that in heavy traffic that is being speed restricted (and managed motorways fall into this category) other drivers are not going to expect someone to be ducking and weaving at silly speeds so the rider in question is more likely to be involved in an accident. A general biking community as you rightly say does not exist per se.

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Unfortunately, in my experience, bikers do tend to get tarred with the same brush thanks to an idiot biker as per the subject of this thread. Usually, a biker like this ends up being an ex biker, (expired, deceased, dead). :shock:

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Same as others have said, time and place for that and it just gives us a bad name :roll:


I also feel bad when you can tell their in a group, and the riders behind are desperately trying to keep up.

I've been that second rider before and it's horrible, trying to dodge traffic because the person in front knows where there going and is meant to be leading you.

yes thats why i always ride on my own
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The thing is though, nutter bikers also give all bikers a bit of a reputation for being nutters, which I think means many drivers just leave us alone and would be reticent at starting a confrontation.

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To give a bit of balance from a car driver's perspective - driving through Worplesdon in Surrey on Saturday morning I eased off and moved over slightly to let three bikes past. All sped past at 60 in a 40, the last one doing a wheelie then overtaking the next few cars into oncoming traffic causing the vehicles to swerve, luckily he came to no harm.

In my experience these were completely atypical as returning home that afternoon I was heading up towards Newlands corner from West Clandon, noticed two bikes behind that I'd already clocked at the lights, he on a nice Bonneville and companion on what looked like a Royal Enfield. Eased off again up the hill as they looked positioned for an overtake and got a nice little wave from both. In my experience this behaviour tends to be the norm.

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If I go out with a group I’ve never ridden with before and they ride like pricks , I let em get on with it , I’ve nothing to prove and I like living to be honest .

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If I go out with a group I’ve never ridden with before and they ride like pricks , I let em get on with it , I’ve nothing to prove and I like living to be honest .

 

My hero ! :)

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It's 2019 - if I'm not allowed to look at you funny if you choose to identify as a hermaphrodite and dress like a chicken, then how bloody dare you judge me if I choose to exceed the speed limit a tad and pop the odd wheelie?! Honestly...

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