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Side stand strength.


Smithers
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I was casually reading some forum scribblings about mounting a bike by standing on the left foot peg with side stand down. This was to do with a bike loaded with luggage items and also to the vertically challenged rider on a tall bike. As mostly usual with forums, no definitive answers were given as to how much a side stand can take before it bends or worse, snaps and leaving bike and rider on the floor doing an imitation of a turtle on his back.

A recent thread on this forum touched on the subject briefly but faded away not be heard of again. I personally would not want to try this, but it seems it's quite commonplace to do this (in the USA anyway) ?

Your thoughts please.

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I doubt you'd break the side stand but I don't see the point. If you're too short to throw a leg over the bike anyway what are you going to do once you're in the saddle with the bike still leaning over on its side stand? Your legs still ain't going to reach the ground.

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I doubt you'd break the side stand but I don't see the point. If you're too short to throw a leg over the bike anyway what are you going to do once you're in the saddle with the bike still leaning over on its side stand? Your legs still ain't going to reach the ground.

 

I think it's the fact that a bike loaded with luggage is what makes it difficult to mount. Ordinarily getting on wouldn't be a problem. Also you don't really need two feet flat on the floor when riding a tall bike.

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Mount from the other side.


It may sound counter intuitive.. you might think the bike will tip over. but, it wont.. there is a knack to it, obviously.. but once you 'get that' its easy.


for me the knack is to put my right foot on the RHS peg.. hands on the grips and as I step onto the peg have my weight just over the 'central line' of the bike. Its an old trick thats been around for years especially for big trail bikes.. now called "adventure" bikes.. that more often than not have corned beef cans as panniers on scaffolding.


by mounting in this way... a greater proportion of your weight is actually on the tyres and suspension rather than almost exclusively on the side stand.

and although.. as has been rightly said. the side stand is usually over engineered. theres the pivot to consider.. and i do wonder how many years that might deal with a "full weight mount" before giving way. because at the end of the day.. it was never actually designed for this type of 'abuse'.

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The brief post on this forum I mentioned earlier, was actually from you Gerontious. I was so fascinated at this method, I went to the garage and tried it. To be fair I bottled it, it just didn't feel right. I may have another go at another time as you're normally regarded as a bit of an oracle when it comes to bike knowledge. :thumb:

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I have a Versys 1K GT and it’s a fairly tall bike. I can’t remember the seat height, but the pillion seat is higher than the rider’s. I only have a 29” inseam so I use the peg method of mounting my bike. Owned it for two years and see no sign of any bending or damage etc. I also use the peg to dismount.

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The brief post on this forum I mentioned earlier, was actually from you Gerontious. I was so fascinated at this method, I went to the garage and tried it. To be fair I bottled it, it just didn't feel right. I may have another go at another time as you're normally regarded as a bit of an oracle when it comes to bike knowledge. :thumb:

 

here.. an american shows how its done.


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'tis the frame that' [mention]Westbeef[/mention] attempted to use, try the direct link instead

 

https://gfycat.com/greedylastingheterodontosaurus-oddlysatisfyingvideo-interestingasfuck

 

Edited as the forum keeps trying to load the video, copy and paste the text above into your browser (works on Chrome, IE may be wobbly)

Edited by SometimesSansEngine
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As I said before, you won't bend or break the sidestand unless it's an aluminum one that's been abused. I know a guy that made his own Fireblade sidestand out of PLASTIC. The forces are almost all straight along the length of the sidestand, so there is no failure mechanism.

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'tis the frame that' @Westbeef attempted to use, try the direct link instead

 

https://gfycat.com/greedylastingheterodontosaurus-oddlysatisfyingvideo-interestingasfuck

 

Edited as the forum keeps trying to load the video, copy and paste the text above into your browser (works on Chrome, IE may be wobbly)

 

:lol: :lol:


nice quick edit!


I guess the forum doesn't like the link I will take a look at it

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I think the use of https doesn't help

 

Nah its the plugin on the forum not rendering it right


I have disabled it so it will just show as a link instead :)

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The brief post on this forum I mentioned earlier, was actually from you Gerontious. I was so fascinated at this method, I went to the garage and tried it. To be fair I bottled it, it just didn't feel right. I may have another go at another time as you're normally regarded as a bit of an oracle when it comes to bike knowledge. :thumb:

 

here.. an american shows how its done.


">

 

That's a good demonstration Gerontious, thanks for that. It's definitely a knack worth learning, even if it's to get you out of a tight parking spot. We are by nature creatures of habit, and always getting on a bike l/h side can catch you out one day.

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It's most useful if you have large panniers and are tired of scuffing them, maybe a bag strapped to the pillion seat which makes mounting in the standard way difficult, or have a tall bike and perhaps are a little less flexible at the hip. As with anything that has an element of risk, the first time can be nerve racking, but it soon becomes natural and as easy as the yank makes it look. You put your weight over the sweet spot without even thinking about it. His tip about holding the front brake is worth paying attention to.

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I'll stick to the left side thanks as I just didn't like the right side get on .. my wife grandson the peg to get on the back my bike as she got wee legs .. she just gets on what ever side she standing .left or right . .


As for the coke can just before it piped at 330 the rings on the can appeared. I would have stopped as the wrinkles on the can was done an cool . But if he /she stopped it would the can go back to str8 sides or stay ribbed ..braniacs out there answers plz

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