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Novice Buying Big Bike


hhh182
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Hi Guys,


First post on the forum so I apologise if this is a repeated topic, but here goes:


I recently turned 30 and decided I needed to do a CBT and learn to ride a motorbike, something I've put off for many years.

Riding motorbikes isn't in my family, nor do any of my friends ride either so I've entered into a new world and language.

A month ago I went and did a CBT, bought a cheap 125cc bike the following day off Gumtree and I have used it everyday for my commute (15miles total) since. I've had a blast so far however the top speed of the bike paired with its low torque have led to me feeling exposed and under powered on my commute which involves fast dual carriageway A roads. (my 125cc runs off at 65mph and doesn't like to go above 55mph).


With this in mind I have already booked DAS for early May and currently I'm looking for my first 'big bike'.

I have read advice re: going and sitting on bikes, but after visiting my local Honda dealer I was told that I would need two years experience on a full licence in order to book a test ride out on any bike.

Is this true regardless of dealiership/ is this a common situation for someone in my position?


I am based in Middlesbrough and motorbike shops appear few and far between. I don't want to part with my hard cash and two weeks later not like the bike, equally I can see why a dealer wouldn't be inclined to loan me a bike being a noobie. Its hard to know what I like when I've only rode one bike before!


Motorbike brand and models are new to me, I know I want to use the bike to commute and even though the 125cc I use currently is naked and I feel the wind draft when up to speed I think this will help me to keep the speed down in future as I can imagine if your immune to the wind drag then that speedo could easily creep upwards.


Models I've looked at are:

Honda CB650R cafe neo

Yamaha MT07

KTM Duke 690

Kawasaki 650


Any thoughts on the above appreciated, my local independent motorbike service centre commented that KTM stands for Keep Throwing Money.. not sure if that is something the bike community agrees with in comparison to the other models listed?

As I've just moved house I will be buying PCP and so looking for deals there.


TIA

Hugh

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I’m currently doing my DAS course and have been riding the Kawasaki Z650 on it for the last couple of days.


It’s a nice bike, at 70mph on the dual carriageways the wind blast is pretty hefty. I went in wanting a naked bike but after 5 minutes doing 70mph on an open dual carriageway I’m reconsidering as I can’t imagine I’ll have much fun if I want to go up the m1 to Yorkshire to visit parents etc...


Fairly low amount of power, it’s still really fast to me as I’m not used to it fully but you can pretty much pin it in second and the front won’t lift which makes me think it’s actually probably really underpowered.


I’m still looking at Naked bikes, but also now considering something with fairing so it’s bearable on motorways and open NSL roads

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I'm trying not to sound like an old fart, but there's something to be said for slowly graduating yourself up from a learner machine to something which has a high potential to kill you.

Saying that, if you've got the money and the confidence, why not.


:fart:

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I have read advice re: going and sitting on bikes, but after visiting my local Honda dealer I was told that I would need two years experience on a full licence in order to book a test ride out on any bike.

Is this true regardless of dealiership/ is this a common situation for someone in my position?

 

Hi - I was in a similar position to you about 3 years ago. It was tough trying to get a test ride, and my local dealer required 1 year's experience with a full licence. It depends on the insurance that the dealer has. I did manage to get a test ride, the weekend after passing my test, by paying for personal insurance. I think it was about £25. I ended up with a Tiger 800 (which I've since sold and got something bigger).


Regarding the bikes, you really are best off trying them out for size, even if you can't get a test ride. Seat height, weight of the bike, and ergonomics are going to be important. Any "big" bike is probably going to feel a bit intimidating to a new rider. The MT07 is a great bike for the price. Which Kwak 650 were you looking at? Depending on what you want it for, the Kwak Versys 650 is another worth looking at.

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Almost everyone I know buys their first bike very carefully and then ends up changing within a relatively short period of time. So my tuppence worth is not to get too hung up about getting it right first time - you won't. Buy something second hand that is in decent nick which you can sell on when the time comes. By then you'll have a better idea what suits you and then it's time to make a longer term decision.


For a novice I think the above advice about not going for something that might get away from you too quickly is sensible. I have a 1200 and a 500. Both can cruise happily at the legal speed limit - one gets there a bit faster than the other though! But to be honest for most journeys I jump on the 500 because it's easier to ride - especially when the roads are wet and greasy.


You also need to consider if there is much filtering to be done on your commute - bigger machines can make filtering less easy.

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Hi from not far up the road.


If your using it for computing there is a lot to be said for fairings and a screen, also more upright roomy seating position gives a good view with less fatigue.


There are loads of bike dealers near you, just put it into Google.


I got mine from pioneer as prices were much better than Newcastle.

Screenshot_20190416-184951.thumb.png.4d5a33e6d521e2c32d2cd99e8360fd05.png

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I'm trying not to sound like an old fart, but there's something to be said for slowly graduating yourself up from a learner machine to something which has a high potential to kill you.

Saying that, if you've got the money and the confidence, why not.


:fart:

those would be my thoughts as well i started life on an fs1e then a 125 yam twin on to an rd 250 and then a gs550 suzuki
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Almost everyone I know buys their first bike very carefully and then ends up changing within a relatively short period of time. So my tuppence worth is not to get too hung up about getting it right first time - you won't. Buy something second hand that is in decent nick which you can sell on when the time comes. By then you'll have a better idea what suits you and then it's time to make a longer term decision.

 

Take heed of this - i speak from experience!

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What I did pal, my first motorbike after passing my test I was about 22 and got a Ninja 636, dont regret it at all and never really had any situations where I thought I shouldnt have bought such a powerful bike so early, 9 months later I got a gixer 1000z.

Ride to germany and back many time north to south uk and never had a issue, just dont ride like a prat and respect the bike and you will be fine....

As for buying a bike tbh pal any bike you buy you will fall in love with, aslong as you enjoy yeself dont get caught up on which to get, all have 2 wheels and a engine haha just do basic checks before buy and ask questions.

Check...


Crashed before

Wheel bearings (side wobble on wheels)

Brake pads

Tyres

Oil on forks

Leaks anywhere on bike

How she starts from cold

Owners other vehicles look like

Check oil for white cream, a lil fine but not alot.

Serviced etc etc

Screenshot_20190416-215613_Chrome.thumb.jpg.94d9cd4d4944de18b337de8cc5b6955a.jpg

Screenshot_20190416-215718_Chrome.thumb.jpg.99e84c64c7c5a45b5299a2e85881d26c.jpg

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Skip the 700s and go straight for a liter bike - that's what I did, no regrets! Saves you losing money when you buy and inevitably sell again :-) I kid, kinda. Speaking of costs pcp is great, but if you buy new the depreciation is bad - my bike dropped £3k in 1 year and I'm thinking of changing now (despite what I said above!) so that's £250 a month loss 😳


That said if you aren't in a position to change bikes often and take the hit then no worries, but bear in mind that lots of people want new bikes all the time.


So I do recommend buying lightly used from a well-reviewed dealer. The pcp Apr will be higher than a new bike but in the long run the loss is less. Or just get a low rate personal loan like 4% from your bank over 5 years. On this 5k bike that's £94 a month.

http://www.autotrader.co.uk/classified/advert/201903236183065?atmobcid=soc3


Actually I just checked yamaha's pcp and its 8.9% - shockingly high! Other offers may vary. https://www.you-yamaha-finance.co.uk/quote/motorcycles/hyper-naked/mt-07/tech-black/calculate


Naked bikes are fine in the wind at speed but you'll learn this on your das.


The 3 Japanese bikes will be fine I'm sure - I don't know much about ktm I'm afraid.


You can usually test ride the day you pass your das - my mate did. Find another dealer if they say otherwise.


Good luck.

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I was in a similar position not too long ago. I got my full licence (DAS) in Nov last year and also had no prior riding experience. It can be daunting for someone new to biking, as there is so much to learn. The options on bikes and gear seem endless, so its frustratingly difficult to make a decision.


I would advise you not to get a new bike. I got a '99 CBR600F for £1,400. Yea it's 20 years old, but there is absolutely nothing wrong with it and it doesn't look that old. So I now have a "proper" bike which didn't break the bank while I'm gaining more experience and when I'm ready I'll know what I want for my next bike and won't feel like I'm blindly throwing money into the unknown.

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thanks for all the replies so far, its been reassuring to read I'm not alone in this daunting position.


I see the depreciation being a major hit on the new bikes. I will have a look through the used section also taking into account what you guys have said.


I am mainly looking at new and 0-4% APR deals as I dont have heavy cash for buying outright currently, nor do I see myself changing the bike for the next few years. (time will tell)


thanks again and anymore words of advise/ bike recommendations I'd be grateful .

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When you do your DAS ask your instructor about bigger bikes. Nobody here has seen you ride, nobody here therefore knows your riding skills. Your instructor will have watched you carefully and assessed you. He/she will be the only person to be able to offer you accurate and proper advice on which sized bike you are ready for.

Good luck.

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thanks for all the replies so far, its been reassuring to read I'm not alone in this daunting position.


I see the depreciation being a major hit on the new bikes. I will have a look through the used section also taking into account what you guys have said.


I am mainly looking at new and 0-4% APR deals as I dont have heavy cash for buying outright currently, nor do I see myself changing the bike for the next few years. (time will tell)


thanks again and anymore words of advise/ bike recommendations I'd be grateful .

 

I don't know what your budget would be in order to buy a bike outright, but if you can't spend around £1,500 there are some finance deals out there. I know you can get a Ninja 650 on 0% finance, for example.

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When you do your DAS ask your instructor about bigger bikes. Nobody here has seen you ride, nobody here therefore knows your riding skills. Your instructor will have watched you carefully and assessed you. He/she will be the only person to be able to offer you accurate and proper advice on which sized bike you are ready for.

Good luck.

 

I tried that and each one was as vague as the next in their answers.

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When you do your DAS ask your instructor about bigger bikes. Nobody here has seen you ride, nobody here therefore knows your riding skills. Your instructor will have watched you carefully and assessed you. He/she will be the only person to be able to offer you accurate and proper advice on which sized bike you are ready for.

Good luck.

 

I tried that and each one was as vague as the next in their answers.

 

Liability ! 🙄

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When you do your DAS ask your instructor about bigger bikes. Nobody here has seen you ride, nobody here therefore knows your riding skills. Your instructor will have watched you carefully and assessed you. He/she will be the only person to be able to offer you accurate and proper advice on which sized bike you are ready for.

Good luck.

 

I tried that and each one was as vague as the next in their answers.

 

Liability ! 🙄

 

Pretty much.

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I have the MT07 as my first big bike and I can't fault it at all*.


Fun to ride, not exactly slow due to the decent torque but also feels safe. I'd say it's quite forgiving. It's very light as well and generally a low seat height (not sure about the 2019 model, the seat is different think it's less tapered) which helps with confidence if you want something to flat foot.


Not a bad price from new but you can get a good bargain second hand as well being relatively new bikes.


* ok, so being a naked it's prone to rusting I believe and it also comes with an almost silent stock exhaust, but this isn't anything to do with actual riding.

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Skip the 700s and go straight for a liter bike - that's what I did, no regrets! Saves you losing money when you buy and inevitably sell again :-) I kid, kinda.

 

I still think you are mad, the MT10 puts the wind up me, but I wonder if it's chalked up to seem scarier than it really is? Even so I wouldn't have bought one of those straight off, its more the level I'd consider a bit later on.

 

Actually I just checked yamaha's pcp and its 8.9% - shockingly high! Other offers may vary. https://www.you-yamaha-finance.co.uk/quote/motorcycles/hyper-naked/mt-07/tech-black/calculate

 

I think this is where you're best looking at local dealer offers - the one near me regularly does 0% APR on new bikes (possibly dependant on the length of time) as long as you put down at least £500 deposit.

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I was in the same position as you. Tried a 35 mile commute on a 125, did my DAS and DIDN'T buy a big bike. I bought an A2 CBR500R. Its still big enough to loose your license with and big enough to crash BUT corners are corners. Experience is experience. The ragged edge is slightly (but not that much) less dangerous. I get 73 MPG (genuine). Sure, I go to the ACE café and feel a little intimidated. There are times when a 100HP bike blasts me.

Because of the licensing laws 600CC is seen as a minimum these days, but who actually needs that except for bragging rights, or that power that you can't legally sustain for more than 3 seconds?


If you're getting a 600cc bike get an older one on a private sale because you WILL drop it. you're a beginner. its understood.

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Long distances at speed on a naked bike can be very tiring :shock:

 

This!, I got given a Monster as a loan bike recently and motorway riding wasn’t much fun after 20 mins.

If you’re going for your first big bike I’d get something that you like but isn’t that expensive if you drop it or to find parts.

If you’re doing commuting what about a VFR800?.

If you do want a sports bike I’d go for a 04/05 ish R6, CBR600RR or GSXR600, all very good bikes and easy to find bits for.

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Hi from not far up the road.


If your using it for computing there is a lot to be said for fairings and a screen, also more upright roomy seating position gives a good view with less fatigue.


There are loads of bike dealers near you, just put it into Google.


I got mine from pioneer as prices were much better than Newcastle.

 

All of the above. Having said that using a bike for computing - not a good idea :lol:


Joking aside any bike you have listed is perfectly fine and many more too.


Try finding DAS training with the bike you may fancy, this way you will have plenty of time to test it during training.


Also many dealers will let you test ride with less than 2 years. Finish DAS do few test rides.

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