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NCD is against a policy not a rider


Beans
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Really, who understands insurance??


I have been riding my 125 then the biffer (Honda CBF1000) for a total of 18 months now. I changed the vehicle details on the insurance from the 125 to the Honda when I bought the Honda so I have always had the same policy with Hastings Direct, just the vehicle changed. I haven't claimed on the insurance in this 18 months.


I bought another bike, rather impulsively, so now I have the Honda CBF and the newer bike. When I was looking for insurance on the new bike, I used a comparison website and got a quote from another company. I filled in the details saying I had a No Claims Discount of 1 year. The company has now come back to me and said that I can't say this, that the No Claims is already "in use" against the biffer. Its a NCD against the bike/policy, not me as a rider.


So now I either have to:


cancel the insurance with Hastings, get no refund of premium paid because there are 3 months only still on the policy, wait and get a letter from Hastings confirming that when I cancelled I had 1 full year NCD and then insure both bikes together for more than the price I was quoted for the new bike , providing the NCD letter to my new insurer. (perhaps obviously but still, I have then lost out on a refund from Hastings and paid more than I was expecting for insurance)


Or


Leave the Honda where it is with Hastings and insure the new bike with 0 years NCD -not going to happen as they want a big chunk of money, that one year makes all the difference. I cant add the new bike to the existing policy with Hastings with the Honda, because it is a bit sporty and Hastings wont quote me for the new bike as I am a "new" rider, despite being 50 odd, car driver for 10+ years and RoSpa member and having NCD that Hastings know about!


Just seems bizarre to me, surely I am not the first to assume that the NCD I am building up on a bike policy can be used against another bike, on another policy, without needing to cancel the first policy.

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That’s how it is , as far as I’m aware can’t use your ncd on two vehicles at same time .

 

You can.


If its a multi-bike policy. and instances like this are the best reason to have one. especially if you have the minimum (1 year) NCD. and so are suffering from punitive prices.


the question that needs to be answered is.


Is insuring two bikes separately. one with an NCD and the other without. Cheaper (or not) than moving both bikes onto a multi-bike and so having the discount applied to both. As a single premium.

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I've never found multi bike insurance to be any cheaper than taking out separate policies... and I've often been quoted 20% to 30% more for the multi bike thing. So I have three bikes, on three separate policies, with three NCDs, all with different lengths :scratch:

As for what to do, get a few quotes from people on the 1) just the new bike with 0 years NCD and 2) a new multi bike insurance with 1 years NCD, and go for the whichever seems like the better option.

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I don't understand insurance at all and I don't mind admitting it . I mustn't grumble though , as I may have previously mentioned , mine went down by £78 this year without me even asking for a reduction . I tried to get a multibike policy but after one and a half hours on the phone I lost the will to continue .

Edited by fastbob
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It's the bike that's insured not the rider, that's just the way it is. You could always write to the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries and ask them for an explanation.

Although I'm not sure any of us would understand the answer. :D

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As said above, when I bought a second bike a multi bike policy meant I could use the NCD for both bikes, plus I hey added business use free of charge for the second bike. Worked out very competitive for me compared to separate policies.

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It's the bike that's insured not the rider, that's just the way it is. You could always write to the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries and ask them for an explanation.

Although I'm not sure any of us would understand the answer. :D

yes we would probably end up with a headache trying to work it out :?
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But is it logical?

If I had 10 years No Claims on a policy, buy a fireblade say and for whatever reason want to insure it with a different insurer, I have to get insurance for zero years No Claims??

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Logic don't come into it, it's simply a way for insurance to make as much money as possible.


A trade policy makes a mockery of any multi bike/car policies, they just insure to a maximum claim amount and let you add what you like, policy is only affected by the groups and the claim limit.


Why don't they do a domestic policy like that, cause they would loose a fortune.

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But is it logical?

If I had 10 years No Claims on a policy, buy a fireblade say and for whatever reason want to insure it with a different insurer, I have to get insurance for zero years No Claims??

 

If you negotiate, some insurers will match your existing NCD used on an existing vehicle on a new policy to get your business. I've done this with cars and bikes in the past.

I now have multibike and multicar policies.

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But is it logical?

If I had 10 years No Claims on a policy, buy a fireblade say and for whatever reason want to insure it with a different insurer, I have to get insurance for zero years No Claims??

 

If you had, say, a CB500 with full NCD. Sell that and buy a Fireblade you'd get the full NCD applied to the Fireblade - no matter which insurer you went to.


But if you kept the CB500 and bought the Fireblade as a second bike then you have two options:


1. If you want separate policies for both bikes then you can apply the NCD to whichever you choose, but only to one of them. For the other you might be able to negotiate some discount, but you can't claim NCD for both policies.


2. Go for a multibike policy which is one policy therefore the NCD will apply to both bikes.

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But is it logical?

If I had 10 years No Claims on a policy, buy a fireblade say and for whatever reason want to insure it with a different insurer, I have to get insurance for zero years No Claims??

 

If you negotiate, some insurers will match your existing NCD used on an existing vehicle on a new policy to get your business. I've done this with cars and bikes in the past.

I now have multibike and multicar policies.

 

So now I either have to:


cancel the insurance with Hastings, get no refund of premium paid because there are 3 months only still on the policy, wait and get a letter from Hastings confirming that when I cancelled I had 1 full year NCD and then insure both bikes together for more than the price I was quoted for the new bike , providing the NCD letter to my new insurer. (perhaps obviously but still, I have then lost out on a refund from Hastings and paid more than I was expecting for insurance)


Or


Leave the Honda where it is with Hastings and insure the new bike with 0 years NCD -not going to happen as they want a big chunk of money, that one year makes all the difference. I cant add the new bike to the existing policy with Hastings with the Honda, because it is a bit sporty and Hastings wont quote me for the new bike as I am a "new" rider, despite being 50 odd, car driver for 10+ years and RoSpa member and having NCD that Hastings know about!


Just seems bizarre to me, surely I am not the first to assume that the NCD I am building up on a bike policy can be used against another bike, on another policy, without needing to cancel the first policy.

 

Not exactly you can do what Joe has done, have 1 policy NCD applied to more then one bike. It's called mirrored NCB.


Leave the Honda where it is with Hastings and ask the insurers of the new bike to mirror your Honda NCB to the new bike too. :cheers:


https://www.quoterack.co.uk/No-Claims-Bonus.aspx


"This is not the same as transferring your no claims bonus from one vehicle to another - with a mirrored NCB, you effectively enjoy the discount on both vehicles at the same time"
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I have used “mirrored NCD” with a few car insurers but personally found it more difficult with motorcycle insurance. They seem to want to push you towards a multi bike policy, which for me appear more expensive than separate policies The last multi bike one I had with Ebike was good but they stooped it a few years ago.

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I have a multi bike policy for 4 bikes , the max no. on one policy, with Carole Nash and a separate one for the scooter.

No big deal to set the multi bike up, usual phone call with my details followed by all the bikes.

£320 fully comp for this one for R1,RGV, GT380 & SS.

Scooter on its own with no NCD was £70

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Multi bike policies start off cheap .. then after 2 years the price creeps up.. insuring separately accumulates NCD. By each policy consequently the overall bill goes down.. it is best to buy /put on the road a second bigger bike when the policy of the first bike is renewable .. so NCD can easily be switched.. but you know that its expensive otherwise .. well now you do .. :popcorn:

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