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Braided brake hoses.


Breadsnapper
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I am thinking of replacing the standard rubber brake hoses for braided stainless steel ones on my 98 Honda CBR 600. Question is is which ones, Hel, Goodridge or Venhill. The Hels are nearly twice the price of the others but are they worth it?

Cheers in advance.

Dave

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What you get is pretty much the same thing,


braided hoses with a choice of coloured plastic wrap. A choice usually of either plate. stainless or titanium fittings. There may be more choices than that nowadays.


in my opinion its best to ignore plate, as it will inevitable show signs of age. stainless should be the minimum. titanium seems pointless on a road bike for fittings that are so small.


Hel make everything themselves and at one time offered stainless fittings as standard. not sure why they would be so much more expensive. if there is a reason then it probably wont affect you.. but might give a very slight edge on the track. Assuming the rest of your brake system is good enough to notice.


When i last did this to a bike i went for Goodridge with transparent wraps and stainless fittings. And I was very happy with the result.

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Cheers for the info. Think the Hel will be overkill as it just a road bike. I don't mind paying the extra but if I am not gonna see a tangible difference then I may as well.save myself some money and put it towards decent pads.

Dave

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When you buy a brake line system you pay for the number of lines used irrespective of length. Very often , a three line system can be replaced with a two line system which is not only cheaper but is often easier to fill and to bleed . A two line system simply uses a double banjo bolt instead of a single one . Whatever you choose , I know a way of filling the new system with brake fluid that takes minutes and requires no special equipment . Let me know if you get stuck .

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just playing devils advocate here but unless you are using the breaks hard and often e.g. on a track or they are looking a bit perished then I wouldn't worry about replacing them.


The braided lines look nice and work well in certain circumstances but for general road riding you wouldn't notice the difference. Hel are good and worth the money and if you can switch from 2x lines to 3x lines (individual lines on the each front caliper) then go for it. Its your money at the end of the. :D

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I've recently fitted the HEL ones to mine, very pleased with the result, they have made a big difference to my back brake especially, It actually stops me now rather than just slowing me down a bit.

They are quite expensive (Mine has a 5 hose system) but they have a lifetime guarantee, not that you would probably ever need it.

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Unless your old lines are perished and expanding the biggest gain in feel would be from the new fluid. Tend to change mine every year to keep it feeling tip top.

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Guest Richzx6r

I fitted HEL lines to the ninja. Can't say I noticed any difference if I'm honest.


I was just going overboard ready for my first track day.

 

You still running the 6 pot tokicos? If so I'd suggest getting a set of triumph 955i calipers, they are a direct bolt on and are much better

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You still running the 6 pot tokicos? If so I'd suggest getting a set of triumph 955i calipers, they are a direct bolt on and are much better

 

No thanks, the bike is completely standard aside from the lines and the brakes are fine because I've maintained them. :-D

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You still running the 6 pot tokicos? If so I'd suggest getting a set of triumph 955i calipers, they are a direct bolt on and are much better

 

No thanks, the bike is completely standard aside from the lines and the brakes are fine because I've maintained them. :-D

 

Yep , absolutely nothing wrong with Tokico Six Pots you've just got to be prepared to completely strip them every few years depending on the conditions you ride in .

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I found the nissin calipers miles better compared to the tokicos


But each to their own :)

 

I semi agree with you Stu - the ones on the ZXR are turd but the zx6r are fine.

 

It all depends which type you have got to be honest are they both the same calipers and interchangeable?

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Floating callipers or opposed pistons ? Any views ?

 

Until fairly recent always had bikes with floating callipers. Needed to be taken off each year and pins cleaned and greased. Pistons pushed out and cleaned. But everything easy to access. Was Kwaks with tokicos though.

Now have opposed pistons and it seems to be fine with just a thorough clean each year. I’m glad of that as splitting the calliper to get the pistons out seems to be a right pain.

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It all depends which type you have got to be honest are they both the same calipers and interchangeable?

 

One lot are a silvery colour, one lot are a goldy colour.

 

Gold are on the zx6? these are usually the better ones and the pistons are coated with something like teflon but the real problem is that crap behind the seals that causes the seals to grip the pistons

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Guest Richzx6r

The real problem with the tokicos is the metal differences between the aluminium of the actual caliper and that of the steel of the piston so when they get wet corrosion happens and it gets under the seals :thumb:

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The real problem with the tokicos is the metal differences between the aluminium of the actual caliper and that of the steel of the piston so when they get wet corrosion happens and it gets under the seals :thumb:

 

The metals are not in contact with each other so don't react! but you are right it is the water that gets under with the salt, it corrodes the alloy making it swell and presses the seals against the pistons.

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The real problem with the tokicos is the metal differences between the aluminium of the actual caliper and that of the steel of the piston so when they get wet corrosion happens and it gets under the seals :thumb:

 

The metals are not in contact with each other so don't react! but you are right it is the water that gets under with the salt, it corrodes the alloy making it swell and presses the seals against the pistons.

 

Correct , add to that a little mineralisation and you've got spongy brakes with too much lever travel . Strip and clean the muck out however , and you will be pulling stoppies with two fingers .

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