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Changes to the sale of Petrol in the UK - Summer 2021


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2 hours ago, S-Westerly said:

According to owners manual MINIMUM octane is 95. 

That's due to the engine management being set for 95 and not being able to adapt to other octane values, either higher or lower. Higher just gets wasted, lower could potentially lead to pre-ignition. You can put higher in without any damage of course which is why they say minimum of 95. Putting lower in could cause damage.

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7 hours ago, Mississippi Bullfrog said:

That's due to the engine management being set for 95 and not being able to adapt to other octane values, either higher or lower. Higher just gets wasted, lower could potentially lead to pre-ignition. You can put higher in without any damage of course which is why they say minimum of 95. Putting lower in could cause damage.

 

I'm not disputing this, just curious - why?

 

If the tech exists for car engines to adapt to different RON ratings, could it not be used in motorcycle engines?

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39 minutes ago, Liveware Problem said:

 

I'm not disputing this, just curious - why?

 

If the tech exists for car engines to adapt to different RON ratings, could it not be used in motorcycle engines?

Ah - that would be the root of evils - money. The sensors needed aren't rocket science, but they just aren't fitted to bikes. 

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3 hours ago, Liveware Problem said:

 

I'm not disputing this, just curious - why?

 

If the tech exists for car engines to adapt to different RON ratings, could it not be used in motorcycle engines?

Not easily - in my experience of fitting knock sensors on bikes, they tend to trigger to easily because of the engine & frame architecture. 

 

All they do is trigger the ECU to adjust the ignition timing. Anyone can achieve this (assuming you're only going to use E10 for example) by fitting a programmable ECU and adding a couple of degrees to the ignition curve.

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Tesco has already implemented the E10 fuel

 

I went to fill up the other day and noticed it had all changed on their forecourt 

 

I don't know when this was changed as I rarely fill up with supermarket fuel but I was desperate :lol: 

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20 minutes ago, Stu said:

Tesco has already implemented the E10 fuel

 

I went to fill up the other day and noticed it had all changed on their forecourt 

 

I don't know when this was changed as I rarely fill up with supermarket fuel but I was desperate :lol: 

Still E5 at my local Tesco today! .. I'm sure it will change as soon as the tank of E5 has been sold.

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2 minutes ago, KiwiBob said:

Still E5 at my local Tesco today! .. I'm sure it will change as soon as the tank of E5 has been sold.

 

Yeah It will be a gradual change across the country due to the logistics of it 

 

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