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going from A2 to full licence.


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This is a question asked way in advance just so I know for preperation.


I passed my test under the new rules at the start of this year, I am 23 which means I can only hold an A2 Licence.


next year I will be going for my full licence as soon as possible. I will need to take it on a motorcycle, of at least 595 cc and an engine power of at least 40 kW (53.6 bhp)


Now my current bike fits within the a2 category unrestricted (660cc, 46bhp roughly).


I dont really want to pay to do my test with a school again and rent there bike.


Could I use my current bike, if i provide a dyno certificate showing above 53.6 bhp or could I swap my bike for one fitted with a restrictor and just claim is isnt restricted on test day?

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I think you have misread this, in neither situation would I be riding the bike there illegally.


As far as I am aware on no documents does it state the engines power, the only way you could prove this is with a dyno reading, Which I can provide, whether its currently running with that amount of power or not.


The second way would be just forgetting to tell them about the restriction. Surely they have no way of proving otherwise?

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Do you not have anyone who could just ride the bike there for you who isn't on the A2 license?

Its a bit dodgy, although theoretically you could "prove" that your bike has the suitable power either way, you're still riding it there illegally because its actual power is too much. If you got pulled in by the police and they were suspicious they'd take you to a dyno, then you'd be in the shit. I mean that's pretty unlikely, but that's the risk you run. I'm also unsure how a test center would take it if you turned up on a bike that's too powerful for your license. I guess there's not much they could do really though, but i find its always nice to have examiners on your side rather than thinking you're the type of guy who happily breaks the law.


About this time next year i'll be in the exact same situation as you. I think for a one off cost though i'll just suck it up and borrow my instructor's bike.

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cheers for the reply but I still dont think this is clear.


I can get a dyno cetificate showing above 53.6bhp for my bike, however it will only have 47 on test day, I wont riding anything illegaly. I guess the question for this option really is will they allow you to do the test on a bike that has been modified to meet category A for the test. the only proof that it has been modified as far as I know would be a dyno reading.


For the second option can you use a bike that would fit in the A category normaly, but restricted to bring it into A2 requirements?

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I think that if you can't provide certification to prove your bike is suitable for the test they can refuse to let you take it...... :shock: and I think it states that a dyno certificate is not acceptable. .....but don't quote me. ..... :wink:

Tbh I think I'd invest the money in using a schools bike to save any potential aggro...... :wink:

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TBH, I don't think anyone here has taken the test using their own machine that is supposed to be de-restricted, we've only ever used school machines. So it's impossible to stipulate with any certainty exactly what the examiner would look for.


AFAIK, it's only 1 test to upgrade from A2 to A. For the fuss it's worth, pay the school the pennies. As you say, you shouldn't fail anything, so re-testing is not really likely.

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I can get a dyno cetificate showing above 53.6bhp for my bike, however it will only have 47 on test day, I wont riding anything illegaly.

 

47 isn't enough to take the full A licence test. The power needed to pass the test is 54ish, which is more than you're allowed to ride on the A2 licence. So either you're riding illegally to the test or committing fraud by lying to the test centre.


And how are you going to get that dyno certificate when you said in your first post

 

Now my current bike fits within the a2 category unrestricted (660cc, 46bhp roughly).
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To be fair my instructor charges £26 / hour to use his 600 Hornet, which probably isn't much more expensive (if not cheaper) than getting a dyno test done and involves a lot less faffing about and risk.

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I think that if you can't provide certification to prove your bike is suitable for the test they can refuse to let you take it...... :shock: and I think it states that a dyno certificate is not acceptable. .....but don't quote me. ..... :wink:

Tbh I think I'd invest the money in using a schools bike to save any potential aggro...... :wink:

 

I have a feeling you are right, even though the rules dont make it clear.


I think you have read the same thing as me where it states you cannot use a dyno certificate as proof of restriction, as this is the only place I have seen a dyno certificate mentioned, I know a special certificate is given for that by whoever fits or supplies the restrictor. It does not mention anything about using a dyno certificate to prove an increase in power though.


I have asked this question on the government website, with any luck I might get a response within the year.

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To be fair my instructor charges £26 / hour to use his 600 Hornet, which probably isn't much more expensive (if not cheaper) than getting a dyno test done and involves a lot less faffing about and risk.

 

If I could find an instructor this cheap in my area this would be ideal.


The dyno stuff I can get done for free though.

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i think your forgetting your not insured to ride such a powered bike until youve passed, so the reality is you cannot possibly be insured on a regular insurance to ride the full powered bike, hence why you cant turn up on a full powered or borrow a mates bike.

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  • 11 months later...

Old thread resurrection....

I don't quite understand parts of this, if you have an a2 license and are looking to upgrade it to an a1.

How can you practice on the appropriate a1 bike legally when that power isn't covered by the prev license restrictions?

And I'm aware the op was querying whether he'd get away with doing the a1 test on a restricted bike without realising without the examiner realising, which I think is a good point....if they don't accept dynos then they can only go on the manufacturer specifications and if it's a big bike whether it's secretly restricted or not they wouldn't know otherwise???

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yammy you are confused!


You upgrade a A2 to an A licence (A1 is for 125 only- you would do that at 17 or if you only want a 125 bike).


As far as practising - basically, you can't! I had a full A1 licence which meant I could ride a 125 without L plates, go on motorways etc. But I could not legally ride the 500 cc bike OH got me - even if I stuck L plates on it - UNLESS with a qualified instructor. End of. You cannot bimble around on a bigger bike, unlicenced, just to practice.


So I booked into a training school, rode their 600, with instructor, took the tests, and got full A licence.....can ride anything licence :D

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