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What is this?


JesterPilgrim
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Looks like a scottoiler reservoir to me.

 

Thanks! That's handy, will have to see if it's hooked up correctly now I know what it is!

 

If part of it is not connected to anything I’d say it’s definitely not hooked up correctly. To be honest having had one you’re probably better off with normal chain maintenance.

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Although looking at it again, the tube that is not hooked up could be the filler tube. The clear one the other end looks like it might have fluid in and the black one is the vacuum tube. I had the touring model fitted so yours is a different design to mine. Look for a tube that’s fitted to the swingarm, running along it with a little nozzle that’ll drop a bit of oil onto the chain every minute or so.

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Although looking at it again, the tube that is not hooked up could be the filler tube. The clear one the other end looks like it might have fluid in and the black one is the vacuum tube. I had the touring model fitted so yours is a different design to mine. Look for a tube that’s fitted to the swingarm, running along it with a little nozzle that’ll drop a bit of oil onto the chain every minute or so.

Will do, thanks!

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I would second the suggestion above that having had one you'd be better off just using normal chain maintenance. I had one and it was always either no oil or too much. On one occasion I returned to the bike to find the rear tyre sitting in a puddle of oil which ruined the tyre.


Since getting rid of it I've used spray wax and have found that to be a much better way to keep chains clean and lubricated. Oil on chains attracts grit and turns into a very effective grinding paste which leads to more wear. If you use enough oil to wash the grit off then you'll end up with oil flung everywhere.

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It's definitely a Scotoiler. The clear tube in the top of your first photo should go down to the back wheel and have a very thin black nozzle that drips the oil onto the face of the sprocket.

The clear tube at the bottom of the photo is the breather and so the other end shouldn't be attached to anything.

Hidden under that you should find a thin black tube that comes out of the centre and makes its' way to the inlet tracts somewhere, where it should be connected so that when the engine runs there is suction in the tube that opens the oiler valve.

Unlike other replies I would always fit one to my chain driven bikes. I have just finished sorting out the oiler on my latest bike, and that's the fourth.

It does depend what sort of rider you are: If you're using the bike every day to commute then the oiler is a godsend, especially at this time of year, as aside from checking that there's oil in the reservoir there is no chain maintenance do you for weeks or even months at a time.

If you're an occasional rider, and don't mind spending a few minutes spraying lube around when you get home then they're probably not for you.

They can be a bit fiddly to set up initially, but spend a bit of time and do it carefully, and they will serve you well.

You're first photo would appear to show the reservoir under the seat and just about horizontal. That's not a good site. The unit should be as near to vertical as possible with the end at the top of your photo at the bottom.

I fitted one to an ER6F and put it inside the fairing on the left hand side.

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I’m on the side of having a Scottoiler. I have the electronic version and it is much easier to control the lubricant then the vacuum version. I hate chain maintenance and the Scottoiler means you don’t have to mess around every 200 miles. Obviously on a tour or winter riding this is a huge advantage. I would not have a chain driven bike without one now.

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+1 for Scott oiler. Yes the vaccum ones take a bit to get set up correctly but when they are it saves a lot of chain maintenance and chains do last longer. Although you do need to give the chain a good clean occasionally.

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Hi as most have said if you into long distance riding run a Scotoiler, my VFR's run Touring tanks under the Number plates, Fiddly to set up, but easy to control once you get the Knack.

But Chain life is so much better, and i never Clean my chain. I normally average 35000 - 40000 miles to a chain :D

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Hey folks, done a bit more investigating. It is indeed a Scottoiler.


Was tracing all its connections, and found one end attached here:

 

IMG_2065.thumb.JPG.21eaa904dcf8d0f7afe434d1ccee3ff8.JPG

 

Looking at the instructions for ER6F installation, their website says "Locate the vacuum – There is a rubber cap over a spigot on the throttle body. Remove one of these caps and then press the Damper Elbow onto the spigot."


So I've obviously found the Damper Elbow. If I were to choose to remove the Scottoiler, what would happen if I took that Damper Elbow off? Note: I see no rubber cap anywhere to replace it!

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