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How long did it take for you to become confident with riding


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I passed my direct access test at the end of last year, and have done roughly 650 miles since. I still occasionally stall the bike on hill starts and have general bike control niggles at slow speed, nothing major but just don't feel 100% confident.


I compare this feeling to how i feel in a car, I've been driving 10 years so am completely comfortable driving in any situation. On the bike however, i still feel a tad anxious in certain situations.


How long did it take others to feel completely comfortable with their bike?


Cheers.

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I know how you feel, I drove for 7 years before getting my bike. I still feel nervous at times, but i am better than i was (passed last september) Just keep riding add the miles on and vary your routes. If you struggle with a corner, keep taking it untill you can nail it. Having a bike that is in good shape helps to. I found after i changed my tyres my bike felt so much easier to control.

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Is that 650 miles of commuting? or is that 650miles of riding because you want to?


I've only been riding for a month or so but finding that I'm getting more confident. I followed advice I'd seen elsewhere about varying routes and tackling different roads and scenarios.


Like some mornings I'll ride to work and go around near schools and stuff, means a lot of low speed and people pulling in and out here there and everywhere. Sounds like it may be a risk to myself but I'm finding it's making me far more aware of my surroundings.


If there are things you know you struggle with then just keep tackling them. Do it when you've got nothing else to do and just relax.


I'm always on the look-out for things to practice on, I like roundabouts for getting my lean on :)

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Everyone learns at their own pace. Do you ride with others, after passing i think i must have put on 600 miles on my first bike and i sold that after a month to buy the bike i wanted (turned out i wanted bigger)


I went riding with experienced riders, done plenty of reading and vid watchin of advanced riding and soon was able to keep up with the others at a comfortable pace, once you learn that the bike can do more than you give it credit for the sooner you will gain the confidence needed.

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I passed my direct access test at the end of last year, and have done roughly 650 miles since. I still occasionally stall the bike on hill starts and have general bike control niggles at slow speed, nothing major but just don't feel 100% confident.


I compare this feeling to how i feel in a car, I've been driving 10 years so am completely comfortable driving in any situation. On the bike however, i still feel a tad anxious in certain situations.


How long did it take others to feel completely comfortable with their bike?


Cheers.

 


First off.. you passed your test at the end of last year.. October wasnt it? then a little delay until you got your bike.. at - the start of winter!!


650 miles over winter.. some might say. thats not much. but a lot more would say thats a lot.. because despite appearances the vast majority of bikers SORN their bikes over winter and don't ride em an inch.


Being new to riding is fraught at the best of times.. not everyone is a complete natural. Its even more fraught during the winter... there is so much that makes winter riding 'bad' - regardless of what the masochists say. (Im one of them.. but even i recognise that by and large Winter riding isn't a pleasure on a lot of days.)


Don't over analyse based on one winter. Have you ever ridden a bike.. any bike in the summer? A warm weekday evening.. when the roads are relatively quiet because everyones watching the latest unlikely drama unfolding on Eastenders? seems not.


We're nearly there.. another few weeks and frosts will be a thing of the past. no more salt on the roads. no more piles of grit at junctions. dry and much grippier roads. the sun high in the sky. less layers needed to be worn.. longer days. it all makes a difference.


a big difference.. especially to confidence.

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Hi getting comfy takes time, even after more than 40yrs of riding going out after a winter lay off l always feel a little apprehensive. After a short period of time it all comes flooding back and everything clicks into place. Learning to relax helps loads, this allows the brain to function on the road and what's happening around you. Top tip, make sure you stretch up and breath deep before you set off get rid of the tension.

Enjoy stay safe

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After the first 8000 miles my confidence had reach the level of feeling pretty indestructible, then I binned it at a decent speed on the way to work :lol: Then over the next 1000 miles it came back again, but with a healthy respect for the road surface and the harm it can cause. Then I skidded out on a patch of diesel, and it went again, but not quite as much. Back again after a couple of hundred miles, and to be honest probably better than ever because I now had a little bit of first hand experience of worst case scenarios. Helps me stay calm, in a weird sort of way. By the time I'd done a total of 13,000 miles I felt pretty damn confident and utterly aced my Mod1 and Mod2. Clean sheet, which made me feel my confidence was justified. Then I got my BMW, which constantly fails me in new and creative ways, and on many occasions has been ridden home from work in less-than-roadworthy condition. Now I'm not sure if my confidence in my riding has dwindled, or just in riding that particular bike, but I know my riding has suffered and I don't chuck it around like I used to.


What I'm trying to say is, I think it's more about the experiences you accumulate, rather than how long you ride for or how many miles.

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I did my Direct access in September. I'd ridden as a kid etc and a little in between to be honest. But it does take time.

I've done probably around 3k since then and rode through winter.

I found for me the best thing to do was challenge myself step by step.

for example.

First time dual carriageway at speed

first time motorway etc

Before you know it you forget what you were worried about in the first place.

If like me you find yourself riding the bike more than driving the car through choice then you'll have cracked it mate. .

Just remember complacency is the devil! !

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I've only ever had one experience with a car (probably to young to really try) sat in the seat and attempted to release the clutch, my idea of slow and the reality of slow was very different.. needless to say it shot forward and that was the end of me wanting or even attempting to get a car (not that it had even crossed my mind anyway, cars really have no appeal to me).. all in all being confident on a bike and in a car is two very different things, so don't expect to be smooth on one because you've nailed the other, although once you've gotten both down to the T.. your winning really.


"Niggles at slow control".. I assume slow moving traffic and clutch control, I'd say don't be afraid to mess about with adjusting the clutch if you find the bitting point to far out or to far in, if your hitting false neutrals or shifts are jerky.. the bike controls are best set to the way that you want them not what the dealerships mechanic sets them to, having controls that suit you can change your ride and make it unbelievably more comfortable the less you have to focus on problems with the bike the more you can focus on your ride.


I personally currently own a Chinese 125 (que jokes) and have had problems with the clutch and gearbox since I've gotten it, thus meaning that shifts are jerky and sometimes lands me in hot water trying to slow control with the clutch.. it has indeed knocked my confidence because I'm unable to judge how well or poor the ride i'm about to embark on is (hopefully will change when I get better bike for my A2 when done).


My advice in terms of growing confidence is just get out there, if you're positive that the control problems are you and not the bike then practice in an empty location at finding the bitting point and slow riding and then move out in some traffic, steady throttle control also plays a huge part in that.. as for hill starts well they're a pain anyway, all in all a combination of rear/front (if needed) brake, clutch and throttle control.. quite a test, I attempted a slow clutch and throttle turn onto a slanted road and ran wide (panicked a little.. still learning) so it varies depending on where you're riding.


In terms of confidence for me personally on my CBT I hadn't even touched a bike before, locked the back wheel up within minutes of being on the road (downhill in the wet) but apart from that never had an issue and went on to pass my CBT first time, I kept putting myself down but the other pupil and instructor just agreed that I was being to harsh and was expecting to much in a couple of hours, going from never riding or touching a bike to having a pass was quite the achievement (if only basic skill is required).. however ever since I've had my Chinese 125 I'd say it's taught me more about having to fix my bike and look after it than any other brand would have (not a good thing for reliability), although the problems with the gearbox/clutch have also had their knock on my confidence, it's not nice having a bike that you don't know how well it's going to behave itself when you go out, hitting false neutrals etc.


All in all I'd say you've got a good bike from a reliable brand, adjust the controls (if needed) to suit you.. IE; Clutch adjustment.. and then get out riding as much as possible, it takes %100 more skill to slow ride in traffic and filter than it does to get upto speed on an empty road.


Good luck :thumb:

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Passed my test at the beginning of last year and have put over 2000 miles on the bike. I now feel pretty confident in most situations. I have been driving for over 30 years too. First long ride was from Humberside to Essex! :shock:

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When I passed 12 years ago I just got on and rode the damn thing what really builds your confidence is riding more and putting the miles in


not running before you can walk helps a lot


I had an advantage I was brought up with bikes and had bikes as a kid


get out and ride more just take your time and the confidence will come

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About a year of full time daily in all conditions. But then it took a knock when I had an off, not a particularly bad one as I got back on and rode away. Since then confidence comes and goes with some days fine and others, I don't necessarily know why, I get a bit of nerves and things do not feel right.

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As others are saying just riding will build up your experiance and confidence.

As you have survived a winter riding your skills will be improving quite quickly.

Set the controls to suit yourself rather than the manufacturer, if you put it into a garage be aware they may set them back to the original settings thou. I normally set the rear brake to have minimal movement between on and off. That's just my preferance and how I'm used to it.

Slow speed control comes with riding and practice. You could get yourself onto a supermarket car park when it's closed and practice slow speed control there. Such as figure of 8, walking pace riding etc.

With slow speed it's more the rear brake you will use than the front brake.

We all stall our bikes at times even those of us who have been riding since the year dot.

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Thanks for the advice and your own experiences all...


Happy to say I've done ~200 miles since my post and can confirm all you need to do is ride! The infrequency and bad conditions i was riding in on a brand new bike wasn't inspiring me with much confidence. The sun came out last weekend and we bonded, beginning to feel i can control her a hell of a lot better now.


So the best advice is to just get out there, and ride 8-)

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Good on you Fulltilt.

Keep it up.

Like everyone else has been saying. It's all about time spent actually riding the thing, getting used to different conditions and to some extent learning not to be a twat.

If you ride over your comfort zone then your confidence will shatter.

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Confidence i found came with its mistakes for me. And now into ONLY 2-3 yrs worth of riding.


I got a bike and my use was a 70 mile round trip into London and back out during rush hour. I clocked 10,000 miles before doing my DAS. The 125 i had was perfect for the journey. Small and light and got me through all the gaps.


I never want to be confident but experienced. Two different things. I have done confident and filtered between lorries on bends, red lined traffic and had my near misses. But they were the most stupidest moments of my life.


I now ease back, take the rides slowly and enjoy it. Learn how your bike works, how it turns and its abilities. I am confident i can ride well.. But i sure keep alert! I still wont ever say there was a time/day that things changed. But over time my experiences improved the way i rode not my confidence. Just never be too confident... Thats all im saying!

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