Jump to content

Mobile Speed Camera


Epic Earl
 Share

Recommended Posts

thankfully I wasn't speeding, but I as riding through a local country village yesterday and I saw what looked like a conveyancer and his equipment going about his daily job.

As I was practically on top of him, I noticed it was a policeman with his motorcycle parked down a country lane. out of site to his side.


I thought all speed traps had to be highly visible these days? is this not the case?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

he was, Im just used to them having their bikes, right next to them. As there was two builders down the road pointing towards him. i thought he was working with them.

I usually dont speed through the villages here. It seemed to cause quite the debate on facebook.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

found this on a legal web site


Defences that are not valid

None of the following can be used as a defence against a speeding charge, even if you felt that you were justified in speeding at the time.


the camera did not conform to the regulations set out for their operation

there were no relevant visible road signs

the speed trap was hidden – there is no requirement for the police to make themselves visible or provide warning when operating in this way

you were late

there was an emergency

the car behind was too close.


which then seems to be contradicted by this on the same site.


Rules and regulations for speed cameras

In 2001 the law was changed so that speed cameras had to be painted yellow to ensure visibility. Many other rules were also brought in regarding speed cameras.


The regulations decree that:


speed camera housings must be coloured yellow

camera housings cannot be obscured, e.g. by trees, bushes or signs

cameras must be visible from 60m away in 40mph or less zones and 100m for all other speed limit zones

signs must only be placed in areas where camera housings are located or where mobile cameras are in operation

in order to make them visible, mobile speed camera operators must wearing fluorescent clothing, and their vehicles should be marked with reflective strips

camera sites are to be reviewed at least every six months in order to ensure that cameras are adequately visible and signed.

The presence of speed cameras can also be indicated with road signs, but this is not a legal requirement.


but i think the second set of rules is mainly for fixed sites.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was caught out a couple of years ago by a bike copper hidden behind some bushes with a hand held scamera. He was just poking out of the bush with the camera no more than 5 yards from national speed limit signs! :evil: of course he caught me doing 37 in a 30! Damn! :evil:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It boils down to force Policy, that's all. Some cameras are painted yellow to be seen, and they can recover a certain percentage of revenue from fines. Same for camera vans. Some will put signage out, some won't. Some will actively declare where they will be on their website beforehand. There's no hard and fast rule about being sneaky.


On a side note, a few weeks back I was shooting down the A14, towards Cambridge from BSE and couldn't quite believe what I saw on the opposite side slip road. A marked police vehicle almost buried totally in a hedge with a copper trying to do a sniper spot with his speed gun. Even as a copper myself I thought it was bad form and was appalled. If your gonna do it as a marked unit, then do it and be visible. Leave the sneaky stuff to the unmarked patrols.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We need to slam on the brakes every time we see one, hopefully causing an accident so we can prove speed cameras make the roads more dangerous not safer ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It boils down to force Policy, that's all. Some cameras are painted yellow to be seen, and they can recover a certain percentage of revenue from fines. Same for camera vans. Some will put signage out, some won't. Some will actively declare where they will be on their website beforehand. There's no hard and fast rule about being sneaky.


On a side note, a few weeks back I was shooting down the A14, towards Cambridge from BSE and couldn't quite believe what I saw on the opposite side slip road. A marked police vehicle almost buried totally in a hedge with a copper trying to do a sniper spot with his speed gun. Even as a copper myself I thought it was bad form and was appalled. If your gonna do it as a marked unit, then do it and be visible. Leave the sneaky stuff to the unmarked patrols.

How accurate are those speed guns in terms of target at a distance? I rounded a corner about 15 over the speed limit and saw a copper pointing one towards me about 500 meters away. Obviously slammed on the brakes, I was over the limit when I saw him which meant he saw me. Was expecting his pal in the car to pull me. They ignored me, which I thought was lucky and odd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It boils down to force Policy, that's all. Some cameras are painted yellow to be seen, and they can recover a certain percentage of revenue from fines. Same for camera vans. Some will put signage out, some won't. Some will actively declare where they will be on their website beforehand. There's no hard and fast rule about being sneaky.


On a side note, a few weeks back I was shooting down the A14, towards Cambridge from BSE and couldn't quite believe what I saw on the opposite side slip road. A marked police vehicle almost buried totally in a hedge with a copper trying to do a sniper spot with his speed gun. Even as a copper myself I thought it was bad form and was appalled. If your gonna do it as a marked unit, then do it and be visible. Leave the sneaky stuff to the unmarked patrols.

How accurate are those speed guns in terms of target at a distance? I rounded a corner about 15 over the speed limit and saw a copper pointing one towards me about 500 meters away. Obviously slammed on the brakes, I was over the limit when I saw him which meant he saw me. Was expecting his pal in the car to pull me. They ignored me, which I thought was lucky and odd.

 

AFAIK they need to be a certain distance in order to be reliable and accepted in court, depending on the model of "gun". Google tells me that a laser-gun has a range of about a mile, whereas a radar version is only effective up to 300yrds.


Also - a motorbike at speed is a slightly harder "target" than a car. I am also of the firm (eg. naieve :lol: ) belief that many traffic police are "sensible biker friendly", which may have helped your cause

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It boils down to force Policy, that's all. Some cameras are painted yellow to be seen, and they can recover a certain percentage of revenue from fines. Same for camera vans. Some will put signage out, some won't. Some will actively declare where they will be on their website beforehand. There's no hard and fast rule about being sneaky.


On a side note, a few weeks back I was shooting down the A14, towards Cambridge from BSE and couldn't quite believe what I saw on the opposite side slip road. A marked police vehicle almost buried totally in a hedge with a copper trying to do a sniper spot with his speed gun. Even as a copper myself I thought it was bad form and was appalled. If your gonna do it as a marked unit, then do it and be visible. Leave the sneaky stuff to the unmarked patrols.

How accurate are those speed guns in terms of target at a distance? I rounded a corner about 15 over the speed limit and saw a copper pointing one towards me about 500 meters away. Obviously slammed on the brakes, I was over the limit when I saw him which meant he saw me. Was expecting his pal in the car to pull me. They ignored me, which I thought was lucky and odd.

 

Car or bike? most speed guns now are laser. If aimed properly they will give an extremely accurate reading as soon as your in sight and fully coming towards the speed gun. Radar works different and although very accurate, is being phased out by most forces. Most of the time they will have the speed logged before you can have time to see them and react. A lot of coppers will use discretion, and will probably 'zap' a few times to see if you have slowed. If not, its tug time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its acutally Humberside police operating in my neck of the woods.

Ive attached a screen shot of where he was hiding when I was caught. Just infront of the national sign, on the left side.

I know its no excuse for speeding, but I was distracted by the boy being naughty in the back of the car, he'd of seen me looking over my shoulder.

Looked round and saw him. Didn't know if i was speeding or not. That is his usual spot to hide, So I'm normallly aware

SC.png.263380c22acd15d62e6c3db74d45c4d2.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speed camera partnerships need to be visible, police can be as covert as they wish.


Welsh forces uses the bloody helicopter. Or hide in a horse box.


http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/04_01/horsebox1RFE_468X649.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Motorbikes have a small cross section and dont have a nice reflective front numberplate to aim the laser at (like cars).

So it makes sense that a cars speed can be read at a greater distance than a bike.

Biggest reflective part on the front of a bike is the headlight... good excuse to buy a New R1 with its tiny little froggy-eye lights??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Sign up now

    Registration is quick and easy 

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Please Sign In or Sign Up