Jump to content
  • Sign up now

    Registration is quick and easy 

Any gardeners on here


Richzx6r
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all just moved in 2 nearly 3 months ago and in the garden there is a large Laurus Bush type shrub thingy which is about 15 odd foot tall, now while I don't want it gone or dead it does need to be pruned quite alot, now my question is when is it ok to get the shears out and cut it back to size as its taking a large chunk of the view of the garden.


Any help would be appreciated thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

April is too early. My gardening book says "remove damaged stems and leaves in spring - trim to produce decorative shapes in summer". I had one of those and gave it a massive prune in summer and it came back even stronger, until I eventually dug it up with a JCB. The root ball weighed about a ton.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

April is too early. My gardening book says "remove damaged stems and leaves in spring - trim to produce decorative shapes in summer". I had one of those and gave it a massive prune in summer and it came back even stronger, until I eventually dug it up with a JCB. The root ball weighed about a ton.

 

I was thinking about cutting it right down to say 2 n half 3 foot tall by a couple of foot around

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just remember it's grown to support the size it is, when you cut it back it's still got the huge root system, it's going to grow like mad, have you read The Day of the Triffids? I think your days are numbered, I would move if I were you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cut a big bush/tree thing back to 1ft off the ground for next door neighbour last spring, it's now 7ft, I have no idea what it is but was so pleased he was cutting it back I got the chainsaw and axe out, I think it needs battery acid next.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cut a big bush/tree thing back to 1ft off the ground for next door neighbour last spring, it's now 7ft, I have no idea what it is but was so pleased he was cutting it back I got the chainsaw and axe out, I think it needs battery acid next.

 

Bloody hell.....that's some growing that like maybe I'll have to ground level the bitch

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's no need to be that drastic. You could reduce height by half one year and see what happens and then prune to shape the following year. Gardening is a long term thing. Unless you really do want to kill it I'd take it easy and see what happens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's a laurel they grow like bloody weeds. My son had an annoying one in the middle of his garden so we cut it back to about a metre high. Within the year it had doubled in size. My wife stepped in and killed it as a menace to horticulture. She takes gardens very seriously and considers laurels as the botanical version of Attila the Hun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You literally cannot kill Laurel. We inherited a 15 high hedge at the bottom of the garden. I took a chainsaw to it and reduced it to ground level. Within a year it was six foot high again.


Interesting thing is that in the spring you'll see loads of bees on the leaves. They have extrafloral nectaries at the base of the leaf. I leave it alone in the spring to keep my bees happy, then attack it come the autumn

Edited by Mississippi Bullfrog
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got one runs along the side of my garden .... Have to do it probably 2 or 3 times a year , I'd like to rip the fooking thing out and put a fence up , but the Mrs likes it , I should start making her cut it she wouldn't like it as much then .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.