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traction control.....


newbiker90
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Hi all,

I have decided I will get a motorbike and put all the fears behind!! But choosing a bike over a car means I will have to ride it all year round, whether its raining, or cold, or slighty icy I will be on that road mashing down the miles. But because of this I will get an adventure bike thats BIG so I can be seen easier and that has ABS and traction control, and because I am a new rider I will get one that is friendly at low and mid end torque........so the answer is.......Suzuki Vstrom 650.


Just a quick question though, how effective is traction control on a motorbike, I hear stories about people fall off due to gravel, oil, big wet patches on the road, would traction control and a big motor bike with chunkier tyres help you stay upright in such situations?


Thanks.


:cheers:

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No technology can overcome the laws of physics but traction control can help to mitigate the unexpected a little. In slippery weather/conditions you need to be extra careful and avoid sharp inputs into the bike, whether throttle, brake or steering. Also get to know the bike really well before taking it to any limits.

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The trick is to ride with a suitable level of caution given the conditions and save ABS and Traction control for those rare occasions when you f**k up.


I have ABS on the last bike and the new one... It's been several years at least since it last activated. I made a mistake and hard braked on a dodgy surface... And stopped.


Not had the TC long enough to put it to the test.. I'm riding normally (for the time of year) and so there is probably no reason why it should activate.

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Traction control stops the front and back wheel spinning. ABS does the opposite. I'm not sure what you are asking . Don't Suzuki cover all this in their advertising?


They do.. Copied below.


Utilising the high specification traction control system from the V-Strom 1000, the new V-Strom 650 is now also equipped with this advanced technology. This system continuously monitors the front and rear wheel speeds, throttle position, crank position, and gear position with various sensors, and controls the engine output by managing the ignition timing and air delivery. The traction control system² can be switched to either of two modes, or off. The modes differ in terms of sensitivity. Mode one allows modest rear wheel spin for more advanced, exhilarating riding, while mode two activates traction control at the slightest loss of rear-wheel grip to give you greater confidence on slippery surfaces or in the rain. The choice of modes can be quickly and easily made by selecting the traction control mode from the left switch cluster and confirming it with a glance at the instruments.

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Thanks guys, I understand your points but lets say you do happen to hit some oil traction control would help somewhat right?

 

Depends on all sorts of factors but if you ride at the limit oil on the road will cause you problems. Traction control could help but not guaranteed. You need to ride to the conditions not the features on your bike.

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Thanks guys, I understand your points but lets say you do happen to hit some oil traction control would help somewhat right?

 

If you're upright accelerating in a straight line then probably yes. It will cut the power to the rear wheel to prevent wheel spin until you pass over the oil and traction is resumed.


If you're banked over in a bend and you hit oil, traction control won't prevent a slide... But it may prevent the wheel spinning up and continuing to slide after you've passed over the oil.


I've had my traction control kick in a few times. Hard, fast overtakes on the dirty bit of the road can often result in a wheelspin which the traction control deals with without issues.

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Thanks guys, I understand your points but lets say you do happen to hit some oil traction control would help somewhat right?

 

As others have said laws of physics, does ABS and traction control help in your car on sheet ice?


The problem with motorbikes and cars is you need enough grip between the tyres and the road or you will be going for a slide. In a car that can be expensive on a bike it can be painful as well. Just like in cars electronics help but don't stop every incident.


My thought is buy a cheaper bike and have a cheaper car as well. Bikes are high maintenance services every 6,000 miles tyres, chain and sprockets need changing from time to time. I would say bikes per mile are more expensive than cars...

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Let us know when you plan to test it..... :popcorn:


This will be good - unfortunately, though, for all the wrong reasons.


1. Traction Control does exactly what it says on the tin. It controls the amount of energy that is transmitted to the road via friction with the rear tyre.

2. If there is no friction - because of a film of oil, diesel or ice - then there is no traction.

3. If there is no traction, then there is nothing to control.

4. Then ignominy will surely follow.


Have fun - and remember, kids, "ye canna change the laws of physics"

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When you hit a patch of diesel / oil / ice, you generally hit it front wheel first. Traction control does nothing for the front wheel (front wheel speed is monitored only to give a reference for the rear wheel).


ABS helps when you panic brake, particularly if you're on wet roads or gravel, preventing the wheels from locking and causing an immediate fall. You may still not stop in time however !


As many others have said, you need to take care on any kind of slippery surface rather than depend on ABS / traction control / rider modes to keep you upright. If you find these things kicking in, you need to think about improving your anticipation and riding skills.

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No technology can overcome the laws of physics but traction control can help to mitigate the unexpected a little. In slippery weather/conditions you need to be extra careful and avoid sharp inputs into the bike, whether throttle, brake or steering. Also get to know the bike really well before taking it to any limits.

 

My bike has traction control but I have to agree with Mike, if it looks slippery ride the bike accordingly, its the same as some 4WD drivers who drive like idiots in the snow, they think they have 4WD drive so are invincible, then wonder why they ended up on their roof.

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No technology can overcome the laws of physics but traction control can help to mitigate the unexpected a little. In slippery weather/conditions you need to be extra careful and avoid sharp inputs into the bike, whether throttle, brake or steering. Also get to know the bike really well before taking it to any limits.

 

My bike has traction control but I have to agree with Mike, if it looks slippery ride the bike accordingly, its the same as some 4WD drivers who drive like idiots in the snow, they think they have 4WD drive so are invincible, then wonder why they ended up on their roof.

 

To be fair 4WD is pretty good for being able to get moving or get up hills etc in snow, but it’s not going to help you stop again!, I think that’s what a lot of people seem to overlook!.


Traction control on a bike is useful, it can help the rear not to spin up or step out, but it’s going to be pretty useless if you hit a load of ice, you’ll lose the front end, I’d definately not rely on it, it doesn’t make a bike crash proof at all.

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...To be fair 4WD is pretty good for being able to get moving or get up hills etc in snow, but it’s not going to help you stop again!, I think that’s what a lot of people seem to overlook!.

...

 

Only if they are fitted with all season or winter tyres (tires), If you think otherwise you need to watch this:

">
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...To be fair 4WD is pretty good for being able to get moving or get up hills etc in snow, but it’s not going to help you stop again!, I think that’s what a lot of people seem to overlook!.

...

 

Only if they are fitted with all season or winter tyres (tires)

One enraging thing - why in the UK nearly all tyres supplied as standard on cars are basically summer tyres?

If I visit my brother in Germany under German law my tyres are illegal in winter so I have been trying for years to get all season tyres which only recently have started to become available. I don't want winter tyres as it means a full set of wheels and then having to store them. :evil:

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...To be fair 4WD is pretty good for being able to get moving or get up hills etc in snow, but it’s not going to help you stop again!, I think that’s what a lot of people seem to overlook!.

...

 

Only if they are fitted with all season or winter tyres (tires)

One enraging thing - why in the UK nearly all tyres supplied as standard on cars are basically summer tyres?

If I visit my brother in Germany under German law my tyres are illegal in winter so I have been trying for years to get all season tyres which only recently have started to become available. I don't want winter tyres as it means a full set of wheels and then having to store them. :evil:

 

I have been using Michelin Cross Climate All Season Tyres on my estate car and they are absolutely brilliant. I have a gently sloping drive and with summer tyres on none of my cars will get up it if there is even a sniff of snow. With the All Seasons on the estate easy gets up the drive even when it had 8 inches of snow on last winter. The handing in the summer has been great as well. Obviously the other two cars stay in the garage when the weather is inclement. The Michelins are also compliant with German and Alpine law for winter tyres.

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...To be fair 4WD is pretty good for being able to get moving or get up hills etc in snow, but it’s not going to help you stop again!, I think that’s what a lot of people seem to overlook!.

...

 

Only if they are fitted with all season or winter tyres (tires)

One enraging thing - why in the UK nearly all tyres supplied as standard on cars are basically summer tyres?

If I visit my brother in Germany under German law my tyres are illegal in winter so I have been trying for years to get all season tyres which only recently have started to become available. I don't want winter tyres as it means a full set of wheels and then having to store them. :evil:

I've got two sets of tyres/wheels (Winter and summer)

Winter tyres on my 4x4 Audi make it unstoppable!

I drive about looking for snow covered hills to climb - great fun.

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...To be fair 4WD is pretty good for being able to get moving or get up hills etc in snow, but it’s not going to help you stop again!, I think that’s what a lot of people seem to overlook!.

...

 

Only if they are fitted with all season or winter tyres (tires), If you think otherwise you need to watch this:

">

 

I’m alright thanks, pretty used to driving 4x4s both on and off road and know to have the correct tyres on them, don’t really off road my current one but still have M+S rated tyres, I’d rather avoid watching a BMW X1 or is it a 3 do anything if you don’t mind :P .

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I got a set of wheels with all season tyres for my Sharan.

My niece has a BMW which really doesn't like snow or ice (rear wheel drive), so she's now got a set of wheels with full winter tyres to try to keep her on the road through winter.

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