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Best chain Lubricant?


Pbassred
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Winter is coming (if that matters) what do you folks recommend?

Having crossed over from pedal cycling I'm surprised that it isn't considered a big deal by motorcyclists. Those guys are always on about how many watts are lost in a chain at 30MPH, cleaning and which lube. Surly the potential losses are much greater on a motorcycle with greater speeds and miles.

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Winter is coming (if that matters) what do you folks recommend?

Having crossed over from pedal cycling I'm surprised that it isn't considered a big deal by motorcyclists. Those guys are always on about how many watts are lost in a chain at 30MPH, cleaning and which lube. Surly the potential losses are much greater on a motorcycle with greater speeds and miles.

 

I know right, over in the cycle world we even get marketed a lube that comes with a UV light to check you got it in all the right places :drool:


I use Wurths but it's the first stuff I ever bought. My neighbour asked once what I was using and I showed him it and he went "oh yes, good stuff that", but wasn't sure if he was just trying to sound knowledgeable (although to be fair he usually is on these things), so others on here saying the same is a bonus.


I find doing a motorbike chain odd coming from the cycling world, spraying it on seems like quite a scatter gun approach vs delicately dropping lube onto the links then wiping the excess off. Unless I'm doing it wrong that is

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My bike has a shaft drive.. the last bike i had.. which was actually a second bike. had a belt. (truly wonderful)


lubing the chain.. seems to me a load of faff. I'm not against chains.. they are efficient. and its very likely the next bike i buy will have one. but.. one thing is certain. that bike will have a scotoiler fitted from day 1.

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I know right, over in the cycle world we even get marketed a lube that comes with a UV light to check you got it in all the right places :drool:

 

 

Muc-off chain lube apparently has that inbuilt UV thing. I tested it, is it barely noticeable no matter what I've light I used!

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I have a can of gel stuff, the chain is still there so I suppose its doing something, if using throughout the crap weather I would go with the others on the Scott oiler.


Reason why no one on a bike is overly concerned about miniscule power loss is we ain't peddling.

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It's whatever you've got really - some oil is better than no oil.


I don't think the ideal lube exists - i.e. no fling, fully protective, waterproof, long lasting etc.


I can't remember what I use but I'm going to give gear oil a try.

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While I was cycling the length of the outer Hebrides my bicycle chain became very dry but I didn't have any chain lube . Then I remembered that I had a bottle of Avon Skin So Soft, the world famous midge repellent , a few squirts and all was well , good anti fling qualities and a lovely smell .

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It's whatever you've got really - some oil is better than no oil.


I don't think the ideal lube exists - i.e. no fling, fully protective, waterproof, long lasting etc.


I can't remember what I use but I'm going to give gear oil a try.

Tiggie's idea of chainsaw oil seems like a good 'un - I mean, a chainsaw blade runs a pretty hard life and they don't seem to throw too much oil off, either.....Nice one. :thumb:

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It's whatever you've got really - some oil is better than no oil.


I don't think the ideal lube exists - i.e. no fling, fully protective, waterproof, long lasting etc.


I can't remember what I use but I'm going to give gear oil a try.

Tiggie's idea of chainsaw oil seems like a good 'un - I mean, a chainsaw blade runs a pretty hard life and they don't seem to throw too much oil off, either.....Nice one. :thumb:

 

My chainsaw spreads oil like the Exxon Valdez.

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Wurth chain cleaner with a decent spiral chain brush to get the crud off, rinse and dry thoroughly (I usually clean it, go and have a brew and then come back to finish the job) and Wurth dry lube for the summer months. When winter sets in I use white lithium grease as you can clearly see the coverage, it's anti-corrosion and doesn't go flying everywhere - you do need to give it a bit of time to set on the chain before riding off though as it comes out quite loose.

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It's whatever you've got really - some oil is better than no oil.


I don't think the ideal lube exists - i.e. no fling, fully protective, waterproof, long lasting etc.


I can't remember what I use but I'm going to give gear oil a try.

Tiggie's idea of chainsaw oil seems like a good 'un - I mean, a chainsaw blade runs a pretty hard life and they don't seem to throw too much oil off, either.....Nice one. :thumb:

 

My chainsaw spreads oil like the Exxon Valdez.

 

So more of a chainsore, then.....?

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Grinding paste is grit particles suspended in an oily carrier.

Guess what happens when road grit is thrown onto the oil coating a chain. Grinding paste is created.


A chain consists of links and pins and rings that make a flexible drive with steel bearings joining them. Grinding paste easily gets in the gaps leading to the bearings and then rapid wear occurs. Tiny gaps due to wear then accumulate over the entire chain leading to slackness which is then removed by correct adjustment. The grinding paste also accelerates wear on the sprockets. Bad news all round.


Did chains have rubber or neoprene o rings to seal the tiny gaps and prevent the grit and grinding paste from getting into the guts of the chain. These oil seals do nothing to minimise wear externally to the chain or the sprockets.


As we can see if there was no oil for the grit to adhere to then less grinding paste issues would exist however no lube also means rapid wear. The only realistic option is to over lube so washing the grit away so it has no chance of creating grinding paste. This is the scottoiler reasoning and its strength.


I personally cannot envisage a chain driven bike without a scottoiler.

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Do you actually need to lubricate O-ring and X-ring chains? Do you just need to keep it clean and let the grease held between the O-rings/X-rings do its job? Just wiping a bit of oil or something like ACF50 over the outside of the chain to prevent corrosion?

Discuss....... :popcorn:

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Grinding paste is grit particles suspended in an oily carrier.

Guess what happens when road grit is thrown onto the oil coating a chain. Grinding paste is created.


A chain consists of links and pins and rings that make a flexible drive with steel bearings joining them. Grinding paste easily gets in the gaps leading to the bearings and then rapid wear occurs. Tiny gaps due to wear then accumulate over the entire chain leading to slackness which is then removed by correct adjustment. The grinding paste also accelerates wear on the sprockets. Bad news all round.


Did chains have rubber or neoprene o rings to seal the tiny gaps and prevent the grit and grinding paste from getting into the guts of the chain. These oil seals do nothing to minimise wear externally to the chain or the sprockets.


As we can see if there was no oil for the grit to adhere to then less grinding paste issues would exist however no lube also means rapid wear. The only realistic option is to over lube so washing the grit away so it has no chance of creating grinding paste. This is the scottoiler reasoning and its strength.


I personally cannot envisage a chain driven bike without a scottoiler.

 

This is why I use wax on all chains. It doesn't hold grit. When I ditched the Scottoiler off my last bike and went onto wax chain wear slowed down noticeably.

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