Jump to content

Torque Wrenches


Scox91
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi All,


I have recently got myself an MT 07 and am looking to install some protective equipment on it however these have torque settings listed. I currently don't own nor have I ever used a torque wrench and wondered if anyone knows what size would be needed for this type of job?


I have seen 1/2, 3/8, 1/4 etc. and I am a little baffled by all this seeing as I can just about work a screwdriver :lol:


This sort of thing plus occasional chain adjustment is all I will be doing so if anyone can help that will be great!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a half inch torque wrench, it goes from 40Nm to 200Nm, good all rounder and does everything I want it to do, from working on the bike (mostly chain adjustment) to working on an old diesel Landrover. There's all sorts of wrenches out there and I empathise with your confusion, you don't need to spend hundreds of pounds to get a decent one, just make sure it has a calibration certificate and it should be good to go. Before you buy ask the question "what will I use it for" and that should in itself guide you to what size you need. Torque wrenches are easy to use, plenty of videos on You tube to help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1/2, 3/8, 1/4 is the drive size, this is less important than the torque range in the applications most people will be using them for - i.e. if the bolts you need do torque to 25Nm a torque wrench that covers 40-200Nm isn't going to do it regardless of its drive size. It's unlikely you will get a 'one size fits all' wrench, I have one that does 10-80Nm and one that's 40-200Nm.


To give you an idea my caliper bolts, pinch bolts, etc are 25Nm so they are the smaller 10-80Nm wrench but the axle is 110Nm so is the larger 40-200Nm one. Generally the higher the torque rating of the wrench the bigger the drive will be but at the lower ends there will likely be a choice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Torque wrenches are much misunderstood in my experience . I only use mine for head bolts, big ends and cam journals and that is to avoid OVER TIGHTENING . Anything else, just give it a good nip up to stop it falling off . A torque wrench can be a dangerous tool in the wrong hands especially on worn or greasy threads . Far better to develop a feel for these things with your hands .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought this one https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Torque-Wrench-1-2-Dr-professional-Torque-Wrench-Calibration-Certificate-Lock/171549899549?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649 earlier this year to replace one I lent to someone who basically misused it :?

It's got a good range and you can buy these https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Socket-Converter-Convertor-Reducer-Reducing-Adapter-Set-1-2-1-4-3-8-From-To/232044365968?hash=item3606ec0890:g:e1wAAOSwErFZzRB4 to be able to use it on smaller socket drives. The torque wrench quoted is not bidirectional and should only be used for torqueing up R/H threads. It's also a cracking price imho.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

By way of a complete contrast. I bought a decent one.


If I were to recommend a torque wrench. My recommendation would be also to buy a decent one. 1/2" 40-200 newtons.


This: £47 with free delivery, reduced from £86 https://tinyurl.com/yym8rbs4


It will last you a lifetime. My watchword with tools has always been.. buy cheap - buy twice. Buy once - cry once.


Ive been working on bikes for years.. and have always considered a T.W. vital.. to do what its for. preventing expensive or dangerous mistakes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What Bob said. More threads have been damaged and bolts stretched using torque wrenches than not using them. Make sure all threads are clean, dry and undamaged. Do not lubricate threads, especially with copperslip.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't believe that.


which is more likely?


Someone knackers a fixing using a torque wrench. after taking some time to learn how to use it correctly.


Someone knackers a fixing using a torque wrench. after ignoring the instructions and advice found readily on-line. And in the bikes shop/owners manual.


Someone knackers a fixing by ignoring advice in the shop manual. ignoring advice in the owners manual. but listen to random strangers who tell them to do it 'by feel'. And by implication that the piece of equipment suggested by the manufacturer is somehow a bad idea.


buying and using a Torque wrench is a bad idea.


Hubris.


and Im done.. but no doubt, howls of outrage will follow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sump plugs are the usual victim, the spec in the book will be for brand new clean threads in the factory before the engine has seen any oil (unless explicitly stated otherwise i.e. coat thread in engine oil) but most people blindly chase the number. See also spark plugs, bleed nipples, rocker cover bolts.


Axle nuts are also amusing, again the spec is for new and perfectly clean threads but people insist on aiming for the ludicrous torque in the book even though the axle and the nut are covered in grease, grime and rust. And then new bikes have a split pin to thread through the castellated nut anyway so you have to go a bit more to get the holes to line up. I even saw a bloke on reddit insisting on torquing the adjuster nut on his steering stem to book spec despite having replaced the original ball bearings and cups with a tapered roller, a completely different kind of bearing with lots more surface area.. How do you even begin to reason with such a person? He had previously insisted on torquing the sump plug to spec despite helicoiling it so the thread is now steel instead of aluminium. Argh.


As stated - engine parts are about all I use a torque wrench for (head bolts, cam caps, clutch centre nut, flywheel bolt) and the rear wheel bolts on the K100 because they're supposed to be 110Nm or something silly so I use the wrench as a guide to keep going until it's mega tight (I usually aim for 90Nm, 110 is surely strippy time).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sump plugs are the usual victim, the spec in the book will be for brand new clean threads in the factory before the engine has seen any oil (unless explicitly stated otherwise i.e. coat thread in engine oil) but most people blindly chase the number. See also spark plugs, bleed nipples, rocker cover bolts.


Axle nuts are also amusing, again the spec is for new and perfectly clean threads but people insist on aiming for the ludicrous torque in the book even though the axle and the nut are covered in grease, grime and rust. And then new bikes have a split pin to thread through the castellated nut anyway so you have to go a bit more to get the holes to line up. I even saw a bloke on reddit insisting on torquing the adjuster nut on his steering stem to book spec despite having replaced the original ball bearings and cups with a tapered roller, a completely different kind of bearing with lots more surface area.. How do you even begin to reason with such a person? He had previously insisted on torquing the sump plug to spec despite helicoiling it so the thread is now steel instead of aluminium. Argh.


As stated - engine parts are about all I use a torque wrench for (head bolts, cam caps, clutch centre nut, flywheel bolt) and the rear wheel bolts on the K100 because they're supposed to be 110Nm or something silly so I use the wrench as a guide to keep going until it's mega tight (I usually aim for 90Nm, 110 is surely strippy time).

Fair comment Snod, my days of engine and major mechanical re-builds are gone. I'd rather spend my time riding a bike than pulling them apart. Axel nuts and brake callipers are the main targets for my cheap and nasty torque wrenches now. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One person on the Internet told me that a torque wrench for tightening your rear axel was utterly essential. Someone else told me that it wasn't, and that you should just tighten it as much as you could (190nm). I figured better safe than sorry as having a rear wheel that's attached properly is handy, so bought this https://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/tools/spanners-wrenches/halfords-advanced-torque-wrench-model-200 and tightened it to 190nm. I am happier than having tightened by hand for sure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One person on the Internet told me that a torque wrench for tightening your rear axel was utterly essential. Someone else told me that it wasn't, and that you should just tighten it as much as you could (190nm). I figured better safe than sorry as having a rear wheel that's attached properly is handy, so bought this https://www.halfords.com/workshop-tools/tools/spanners-wrenches/halfords-advanced-torque-wrench-model-200 and tightened it to 190nm. I am happier than having tightened by hand for sure.

 

190nm!! that's tight. Book for mine is only 98nm, but goddamn it I give it 100 just to err on the safe side. :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is confusion here . There are applications such as cylinder head bolts where PRESSURE needs to be applied to stop the combustion gases seeping past the head gasket . Nearly everything else is just a case of finding the sweet spot where the bolt doesn't undo itself and you don't rip the thread out .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is confusion here . There are applications such as cylinder head bolts where PRESSURE needs to be applied to stop the combustion gases seeping past the head gasket . Nearly everything else is just a case of finding the sweet spot where the bolt doesn't undo itself and you don't rip the thread out .

 

Where's the confusion fastbob?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is confusion here . There are applications such as cylinder head bolts where PRESSURE needs to be applied to stop the combustion gases seeping past the head gasket . Nearly everything else is just a case of finding the sweet spot where the bolt doesn't undo itself and you don't rip the thread out .

 

Disagree ...

consider taper bearings they require a certain tightness to be effective.

Consider how much force going wide open throttle in first gear puts on an rear axle bolt .

Yes things may be effective at lower settings but the manufacturer gives that number to cover all bases ...their arse and yours .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is confusion here . There are applications such as cylinder head bolts where PRESSURE needs to be applied to stop the combustion gases seeping past the head gasket . Nearly everything else is just a case of finding the sweet spot where the bolt doesn't undo itself and you don't rip the thread out .

 

Disagree ...

consider taper bearings they require a certain tightness to be effective.

Consider how much force going wide open throttle in first gear puts on an rear axle bolt .

Yes things may be effective at lower settings but the manufacturer gives that number to cover all bases ...their arse and yours .

 

I completely agree with the first bit , that's what I said , a pressure application . But I can't see how the power of the engine could undo an axel bolt .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is confusion here . There are applications such as cylinder head bolts where PRESSURE needs to be applied to stop the combustion gases seeping past the head gasket . Nearly everything else is just a case of finding the sweet spot where the bolt doesn't undo itself and you don't rip the thread out .

 

How do you define the sweet spot to the inexperienced?

May not matter so much if a non critical component but what if its a caliper bolt or suspension mounting?

A calibrated torque wrench properly used to the manufacturer's spec for that fastener will take the guesswork out of it.

If the thread is knackered and doesn't hold the torque then it needs repairing or replacing


Norbar do a good range of wrenches at reasonable cost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Sign up now

    Registration is quick and easy 

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use Privacy Policy Guidelines We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

Please Sign In or Sign Up